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I am creating REST based APIs for an app using Tastypie with Django. The problem is default API url in Tastypie contains version info in url patterns i.e.

http://lx:3001/api/v1/vservers/?username=someuser&api_key=someapikey

I want my url to be free from API version info like this:

http://lx:3001/api/vservers/?username=someuser&api_key=someapikey

urls.py

v1_api = Api()
v1_api.api_name = ''
v1_api.register(UserResource())
...
url(r'^api/', include(v1_api.urls)),

I am overwriting api_name with an empty string still

http://lx:3001/api/vservers/?username=someuser&api_key=someapikey does not work.

How can I get rid of the version info altogether?

Thanks..

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2  
That's not a good idea. You should always version your API. If you change something in the future you'll regret this decision. –  santiagobasulto Oct 18 '12 at 19:03
    
I agree. This is a feature. Versioning the API allows you to remain backwards-compatible when you (inevitably) need to add to, or alter the API going forward. Clients that have not updated their calls yet, can still function, while new clients can take advantage of the new APIs features. –  Chris Pratt Oct 18 '12 at 19:47
    
My idea was to direct clients to the latest version of API at any point of them w/o them knowing the version info.. –  splintercell Oct 18 '12 at 21:02
    
Very bad idea, their apps will break. Consider the situation when you release new API and their apps start using it without necessary changes. –  kgr Oct 19 '12 at 16:27
    
Thanks for the clarification. I am keeping the version info in the url . –  splintercell Oct 19 '12 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Subclass Api and override urls to remove all the api_name-related bits:

class MyApi(Api):
    @property
    def urls(self):
        """
        Provides URLconf details for the ``Api`` and all registered
        ``Resources`` beneath it.
        """
        pattern_list = [
            url(r"^%s$" % trailing_slash(), self.wrap_view('top_level'), name="api_top_level"),
        ]

        for name in sorted(self._registry.keys()):
            pattern_list.append((r"^/", include(self._registry[name].urls)))

        urlpatterns = self.override_urls() + patterns('',
            *pattern_list
        )
        return urlpatterns
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Thanks dokkaebi for the code snippet. Will be keeping the version info in the REST url for now.. –  splintercell Oct 19 '12 at 18:53
    
Probably for the best. Those two little characters could save a world of hurt when you decide to change the API. Out of curiosity, did this snippet work? –  dokkaebi Oct 19 '12 at 19:00

Although tastypie makes supplying api_name optional, failing to provide one simply defaults api_name to "v1". This behavior can be modified by subclassing Api and overriding the urls property within api.py to behave independently of api_name. To achieve the desired URLconf, however, there's still one correction to @dokkaebi's solution worth noting:

pattern_list.append((r"^/", include(self._registry[name].urls)))

should instead read:

pattern_list.append((r'', include(self._registry[name].urls)))

in order to avoid the dreaded // that would direct your clients to

http://lx:3001/api//vservers/?username=someuser&api_key=someapikey in place of http://lx:3001/api/vservers/?username=someuser&api_key=someapikey as intended.

For convenience, I've included the modified code below.

Solution

class MyApi(Api):
"""
An API subclass that circumvents api_name versioning.
"""
@property
def urls(self):
    """
    Provides URLconf details for the ``Api`` and all registered
    ``Resources`` beneath it.
    """
    pattern_list = [
        url(r"^%s$" % trailing_slash(), self.wrap_view('top_level'), name="api_top_level"),
    ]

    for name in sorted(self._registry.keys()):
        pattern_list.append((r'', include(self._registry[name].urls)))

    urlpatterns = self.override_urls() + patterns('',
        *pattern_list
    )
    return urlpatterns

Convention

One of Django’s core philosophies is that URLs should be beautiful; a clean, elegant URL scheme is an important detail in any high-quality Web application. With respect to the validity of this approach, using a custom request header or an accept header will get the versioning job done without convoluting the scheme with the (subjectively) ugly v1/. That is not to say that the URL versioning strategy is without its share of caveats; however, it's quick to implement and predictable in its response.

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