Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this acrticle, why in the loop is i incremented by 4 instead of by 1?. I tried changong i+=4 to i++ but it doesn't work properly. Could you please tell me what is the reason behind?

function grayScale(context, canvas) {
    var imgData = context.getImageData(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
        var pixels  = imgData.data;
        for (var i = 0, n = pixels.length; i < n; i += 4) {
        var grayscale = pixels[i] * .3 + pixels[i+1] * .59 + pixels[i+2] * .11;
        pixels[i  ] = grayscale;        // red
        pixels[i+1] = grayscale;        // green
        pixels[i+2] = grayscale;        // blue
        //pixels[i+3]              is alpha
    }
    //redraw the image in black & white
    context.putImageData(imgData, 0, 0);
  }
  //add the function call in the imageObj.onload
  imageObj.onload = function(){
      context.drawImage(imageObj, destX, destY);
      grayScale(context, canvas);
  };
share|improve this question
2  
Because what happens in the for-loop is modifying four spots in the array which represent the red, green, blue, and alpha channels which make up a single pixel. The for-loop increments by 4 to jump to the next set of red, green, blue, and alpha channels for the next pixel. –  Cᴏʀʏ Oct 18 '12 at 19:31
    
Because each single "pixel" takes up 4 elements of the array. I think the name "pixels" for the array is misleading in this example. –  Dave Rager Oct 18 '12 at 19:32
    
What Cory said :) If you simply did i++, every loop it'll increment i by 1 and not 4. the image data array contains data of fours for every pixel (red,green,blue, alpha). –  cbayram Oct 18 '12 at 19:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Look at the actual code, they are using pixels[i] but also pixels[i+1], pixels[i+2] and a commented out pixels[i+3]. These are four values at a time, not just one.

In this context of pixels from an image it is actually very common to increment by four (or three if alpha is completely absent in the data) since the order comes in as RGBA.

If you look at the comments they even point this fact out (stripped of unnecessary parts):

pixels[i  ]                     // red
pixels[i+1]                     // green
pixels[i+2]                     // blue
pixels[i+3]                     // alpha

If you consider the layout in the array it makes a whole lot of sense:

Array:       [r0,g0,b0,a0,r1,g1,b1,a1,r2,...etc]
Positions:     0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

We need to go from 0 to 4 to 8 if we are to always get red first.

share|improve this answer

It looks to me like i=red, i+1=green, i+2=blue, and i+3=alpha. So i+4 would be red again. So the for loop iterates across the array by four instead of one to distinguish separate pixels.

share|improve this answer

Because what happens in the for-loop is modifying four spots in the array which represent the red, green, blue, and alpha channels which make up a single pixel. The for-loop increments by 4 to jump to the next set of red, green, blue, and alpha channels for the next pixel.

share|improve this answer

Each iteration of the loop operates on a sequence of four items from the collection, starting on the current value of i.

Therefore the beginning of the next sequence is i + 4.

share|improve this answer

An ImageData object is basically an array of pixels.

In CSS, when you set color : rgba( 255, 40, 30, 1 ); you're setting red, green, blue and alpha(transparency). That's the order that each pixel is.

But ALL pixels are stored as four colours, back to back in a straight line.

So a 2x2 black and white image looks like this:

var checkerboard = [ 0, 0, 0, 1, 255, 255, 255, 1, 255, 255, 255, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1 ];

That's the 3 rgbs to make black in the top-left pixel (and 1 for 100% visible), followed by white in the top-right, followed by white in the bottom-left, followed by black in the bottom right.

So when you're dealing with code which modifies individual pixels, you're including ALL of the colour/alpha channels which make up 1 pixel.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.