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At work I've been tasked with turning a bunch of HTML files into a simple JSP project. It's really all static, no serverside logic to program. I should mention I'm completely new to Java. JSP files seem to make it easy to work with common includes and variables, much like PHP, but I'd like to know a simple way to get something like template inheritance (Django style) or at least be able to have a base.jsp file containing the header and the footer, so I can insert content later.

Ben Lings seems to offer some hope in his answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/490390/jsp-template-inheritance Can someone explain how to achieve this?

Given that I don't have much time I think dynamic routing is a little much, so I'm happy to just to have URLs map directly onto .jsp files, but I'm open to suggestion.

Thanks.

edit: I don't want to use any external libraries, because it would increase the learning curve for myself and others who work on the project, and the company I work for has been contracted to do this.

Another edit: I'm not sure if JSP tags will be useful because my content doesn't really have any template variables. What I need is a way to be able to do this:

base.html:

<html><body>
{ content.body }
</body></html>

somepage.html

<wrapper:base.html>
<h1>Welcome</h1>
</wrapper>

with the output being:

<html><body>
<h1>Welcome</h1>
</body></html>

I think this would give me enough versatility to do everything I need. It could be achieved with includes but then I would need a top and a bottom include for each wrapper, which is kind of messy.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 349 down vote accepted

As skaffman suggested, JSP 2.0 Tag Files are the bee knees.

Let's take your simple example.

Put the following in WEB-INF/tags/wrapper.tag

<%@tag description="Simple Wrapper Tag" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<html><body>
  <jsp:doBody/>
</body></html>

Now in your example.jsp page:

<%@page contentType="text/html" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>

<t:wrapper>
    <h1>Welcome</h1>
</t:wrapper>

That does exactly what you think it does.

So, lets expand upon that to something a bit more general. WEB-INF/tags/genericpage.tag

<%@tag description="Overall Page template" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@attribute name="header" fragment="true" %>
<%@attribute name="footer" fragment="true" %>
<html>
  <body>
    <div id="pageheader">
      <jsp:invoke fragment="header"/>
    </div>
    <div id="body">
      <jsp:doBody/>
    </div>
    <div id="pagefooter">
      <jsp:invoke fragment="footer"/>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

To use this:

<%@page contentType="text/html" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>

<t:genericpage>
    <jsp:attribute name="header">
      <h1>Welcome</h1>
    </jsp:attribute>
    <jsp:attribute name="footer">
      <p id="copyright">Copyright 1927, Future Bits When There Be Bits Inc.</p>
    </jsp:attribute>
    <jsp:body>
        <p>Hi I'm the heart of the message</p>
    </jsp:body>
</t:genericpage>

What does that buy you? A lot really, but it gets even better

WEB-INF/tags/userpage.tag

<%@tag description="User Page template" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
<%@attribute name="userName" required="true"%>

<t:genericpage>
    <jsp:attribute name="header">
      <h1>Welcome ${userName}</h1>
    </jsp:attribute>
    <jsp:attribute name="footer">
      <p id="copyright">Copyright 1927, Future Bits When There Be Bits Inc.</p>
    </jsp:attribute>
    <jsp:body>
        <jsp:doBody/>
    </jsp:body>
</t:genericpage>

To use this: (assume we have a user variable in the request)

<%@page contentType="text/html" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>

<t:userpage userName="${user.fullName}">
  <p>
    First Name: ${user.firstName} <br/>
    Last Name: ${user.lastName} <br/>
    Phone: ${user.phone}<br/>
  </p>
</t:userpage>

But it turns you like to use that user detail block in other places. So, we'll refactor it. WEB-INF/tags/userdetail.tag

<%@tag description="User Page template" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@tag import="com.example.User" %>
<%@attribute name="user" required="true" type="com.example.User"%>

First Name: ${user.firstName} <br/>
Last Name: ${user.lastName} <br/>
Phone: ${user.phone}<br/>

Now the previous example becomes:

<%@page contentType="text/html" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>

<t:userpage userName="${user.fullName}">
  <p>
    <t:userdetail user="${user}"/>
  </p>
</t:userpage>

The beauty of JSP Tag files is that it lets you basically tag generic markup and then refactor it to your hearts content.

JSP Tag Files have pretty much usurped things like Tiles etc., at least for me. I find them much easier to use as the only structure is what you give it, nothing preconceived. Plus you can use JSP tag files for other things (like the user detail fragment above).

Here's an example that is similar to DisplayTag that I've done, but this is all done with Tag Files (and the Stripes framework, that's the s: tags..). This results in a table of rows, alternating colors, page navigation, etc.:

<t:table items="${actionBean.customerList}" var="obj" css_class="display">
  <t:col css_class="checkboxcol">
    <s:checkbox name="customerIds" value="${obj.customerId}"
                onclick="handleCheckboxRangeSelection(this, event);"/>
  </t:col>
  <t:col name="customerId" title="ID"/>
  <t:col name="firstName" title="First Name"/>
  <t:col name="lastName" title="Last Name"/>
  <t:col>
    <s:link href="/Customer.action" event="preEdit">
      Edit
      <s:param name="customer.customerId" value="${obj.customerId}"/>
      <s:param name="page" value="${actionBean.page}"/>
    </s:link>
  </t:col>
</t:table>

Of course the tags work with the JSTL tags (like c:if, etc.). Only thing you can't do within the body of a tag file tag, is add java scriptlet code, but this isn't as much of a limitation as you might think. If I need scriptlet stuff, I just put the logic in to a tag and drop the tag in. Easy.

So, tag files can be pretty much whatever you want them to be. At the most basic level, it's simple cut and paste refactoring. Grab a chunk of layout, cut it out, do some simple parameterization, and replace it with a tag invocation.

At a higher level you can do sophisticated things like this table tag I have here.

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12  
Thanks for this. It's the best tutorial I could find on JSP tag files, which were great for me coming from JSF. Wish I could give more than one up vote. –  digitaljoel Nov 1 '10 at 22:04
29  
+40million. Thank you for explaining it 50,000 times better than any crappy tutorial I've found. Coming from the Rails world and missing ERB, this is exactly what I need. You should write a blog. –  cbmeeks Apr 8 '11 at 13:35
1  
Really nice tutorial. Could you share with us the code for the table tag that you've made? I created one myself a while ago but your approach is better. –  dooart Apr 27 '12 at 21:28
1  
Very useful tutorial, thanks a bunch! A little question though: when you say "If I need scriptlet stuff, I just put the logic in to a tag and drop the tag in.", you actually mean taglib right? Because otherwise you seem to say that scriptlet code can't be used in a tag, but a workaround is to add it to a another tag instead! –  electrotype Jul 12 '12 at 23:33
4  
If you create a tag file tag, the contents of that tag in the JSP file can not have scriptlet code: <t:mytag> no scriptlet code here </t:mytag>. But within the tag file implementing the tag itself, that can have all the scriptlet code you want, like any JSP. –  Will Hartung Jul 12 '12 at 23:39

I made quite easy, Django style JSP Template inheritance tag library. https://github.com/kwon37xi/jsp-template-inheritance

I think it make easy to manage layouts without learning curve.

example code :

base.jsp : layout

<%@page contentType="text/html; charset=UTF-8" %>
<%@ taglib uri="http://kwonnam.pe.kr/jsp/template-inheritance" prefix="layout"%>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>JSP Template Inheritance</title>
    </head>

<h1>Head</h1>
<div>
    <layout:block name="header">
        header
    </layout:block>
</div>

<h1>Contents</h1>
<div>
    <p>
    <layout:block name="contents">
        <h2>Contents will be placed under this h2</h2>
    </layout:block>
    </p>
</div>

<div class="footer">
    <hr />
    <a href="https://github.com/kwon37xi/jsp-template-inheritance">jsp template inheritance example</a>
</div>
</html>

view.jsp : contents

<%@page contentType="text/html; charset=UTF-8" %>
<%@ taglib uri="http://kwonnam.pe.kr/jsp/template-inheritance" prefix="layout"%>
<layout:extends name="base.jsp">
    <layout:put name="header" type="REPLACE">
        <h2>This is an example about layout management with JSP Template Inheritance</h2>
    </layout:put>
    <layout:put name="contents">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Proin porta,
        augue ut ornare sagittis, diam libero facilisis augue, quis accumsan enim velit a mauris.
    </layout:put>
</layout:extends>
share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful. Should be up voted many times. –  Basil Musa Nov 1 '13 at 14:29

Use tiles. It saved my life.

But if you can't, there's the include tag, making it similar to php.

The body tag might not actually do what you need it to, unless you have super simple content. The body tag is used to define the body of a specified element. Take a look at this example:

<jsp:element name="${content.headerName}"   
   xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page">    
   <jsp:attribute name="lang">${content.lang}</jsp:attribute>   
   <jsp:body>${content.body}</jsp:body> 
</jsp:element>

You specify the element name, any attributes that element might have ("lang" in this case), and then the text that goes in it--the body. So if

  • content.headerName = h1,
  • content.lang = fr, and
  • content.body = Heading in French

Then the output would be

<h1 lang="fr">Heading in French</h1>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for both recommendations. –  Adeel Ansari Aug 19 '09 at 4:13

You should be aware that using JSP with lots of <%...%> all over, has generally showed to create applications that are hard to maintain (of a non-trivial size).

Hence, you should already now prepare yourself for having to learn an additional layer, either for this or the next project. Personally I chose JSF for a project which allowed for pure XML jsp-pages invoking taglibs, which was reasonably nice, but had a steep learning curve so I will not recommend it unless you have considered it carefully first :)

Regardless of what technology you choose, take one that allows you to separate presentation from actual code. You will appreciate this some day.

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3  
There's a really massive gap between <% %> includes, and JSF, and that gap is full of dozens of incrementally more complex solutions. –  skaffman Aug 18 '09 at 21:16
    
Yes. It is a steep learning curve :( –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 4 '09 at 15:17
2  
I have found that using any of the JSP "improvements" over <%...%> results in applications that are even harder to maintain. –  Magnus Aug 17 '12 at 21:03

Based on the same basic idea as in @Will Hartung's answer, here is my magic one-tag extensible template engine. It even includes documentation and an example :-)

WEB-INF/tags/block.tag:

<%--
    The block tag implements a basic but useful extensible template system.

    A base template consists of a block tag without a 'template' attribute.
    The template body is specified in a standard jsp:body tag, which can
    contain EL, JSTL tags, nested block tags and other custom tags, but
    cannot contain scriptlets (scriptlets are allowed in the template file,
    but only outside of the body and attribute tags). Templates can be
    full-page templates, or smaller blocks of markup included within a page.

    The template is customizable by referencing named attributes within
    the body (via EL). Attribute values can then be set either as attributes
    of the block tag element itself (convenient for short values), or by
    using nested jsp:attribute elements (better for entire blocks of markup).

    Rendering a template block or extending it in a child template is then
    just a matter of invoking the block tag with the 'template' attribute set
    to the desired template name, and overriding template-specific attributes
    as necessary to customize it.

    Attribute values set when rendering a tag override those set in the template
    definition, which override those set in its parent template definition, etc.
    The attributes that are set in the base template are thus effectively used
    as defaults. Attributes that are not set anywhere are treated as empty.

    Internally, attributes are passed from child to parent via request-scope
    attributes, which are removed when rendering is complete.

    Here's a contrived example:

    ====== WEB-INF/tags/block.tag (the template engine tag)

    <the file you're looking at right now>

    ====== WEB-INF/templates/base.jsp (base template)

    <%@ page trimDirectiveWhitespaces="true" %>
    <%@ taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
    <t:block>
        <jsp:attribute name="title">Template Page</jsp:attribute>
        <jsp:attribute name="style">
            .footer { font-size: smaller; color: #aaa; }
            .content { margin: 2em; color: #009; }
            ${moreStyle}
        </jsp:attribute>
        <jsp:attribute name="footer">
            <div class="footer">
                Powered by the block tag
            </div>
        </jsp:attribute>
        <jsp:body>
            <html>
                <head>
                    <title>${title}</title>
                    <style>
                        ${style}
                    </style>
                </head>
                <body>
                    <h1>${title}</h1>
                    <div class="content">
                        ${content}
                    </div>
                    ${footer}
                </body>
            </html>
        </jsp:body>
    </t:block>

    ====== WEB-INF/templates/history.jsp (child template)

    <%@ page trimDirectiveWhitespaces="true" %>
    <%@ taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
    <t:block template="base" title="History Lesson">
        <jsp:attribute name="content" trim="false">
            <p>${shooter} shot first!</p>
        </jsp:attribute>
    </t:block>

    ====== history-1977.jsp (a page using child template)

    <%@ page trimDirectiveWhitespaces="true" %>
    <%@ taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
    <t:block template="history" shooter="Han" />

    ====== history-1997.jsp (a page using child template)

    <%@ page trimDirectiveWhitespaces="true" %>
    <%@ taglib prefix="t" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
    <t:block template="history" title="Revised History Lesson">
        <jsp:attribute name="moreStyle">.revised { font-style: italic; }</jsp:attribute>
        <jsp:attribute name="shooter"><span class="revised">Greedo</span></jsp:attribute>
    </t:block>

--%>

<%@ tag trimDirectiveWhitespaces="true" %>
<%@ tag import="java.util.HashSet, java.util.Map, java.util.Map.Entry" %>
<%@ tag dynamic-attributes="dynattributes" %>
<%@ attribute name="template" %>
<%
    // get template name (adding default .jsp extension if it does not contain
    // any '.', and /WEB-INF/templates/ prefix if it does not start with a '/')
    String template = (String)jspContext.getAttribute("template");
    if (template != null) {
        if (!template.contains("."))
            template += ".jsp";
        if (!template.startsWith("/"))
            template = "/WEB-INF/templates/" + template;
    }
    // copy dynamic attributes into request scope so they can be accessed from included template page
    // (child is processed before parent template, so only set previously undefined attributes)
    Map<String, String> dynattributes = (Map<String, String>)jspContext.getAttribute("dynattributes");
    HashSet<String> addedAttributes = new HashSet<String>();
    for (Map.Entry<String, String> e : dynattributes.entrySet()) {
        if (jspContext.getAttribute(e.getKey(), PageContext.REQUEST_SCOPE) == null) {
            jspContext.setAttribute(e.getKey(), e.getValue(), PageContext.REQUEST_SCOPE);
            addedAttributes.add(e.getKey());
        }
    }
%>

<% if (template == null) { // this is the base template itself, so render it %>
    <jsp:doBody/>
<% } else { // this is a page using the template, so include the template instead %>
    <jsp:include page="<%= template %>" />
<% } %>

<%
    // clean up the added attributes to prevent side effect outside the current tag
    for (String key : addedAttributes) {
        jspContext.removeAttribute(key, PageContext.REQUEST_SCOPE);
    }
%>
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