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Since IEnumerable has a covariant parameter in C# 4.0 I am confused how it is behaving in the following code.

public class Test
{
    IEnumerable<IFoo> foos;

    public void DoTestOne<H>(IEnumerable<H> bars) where H : IFoo
    {
        foos = bars;
    }

    public void DoTestTwo(IEnumerable<IBar> bars)
    {
        foos = bars;
    }
}
public interface IFoo
{
}
public interface IBar : IFoo
{
}

So basically the DoTestOne method doesn't compile while DoTestTwo does. In addition to why it doesn't work, if anyone knows how I can achieve the effect of DoTestOne (assigning an IEnumberable<H> where H : IFoo to an IEnumberable<IFoo>) I would appreciate the help.

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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you know that H will be a class, this does work:

    public void DoTestOne<H>(IEnumerable<H> bars) where H : class, IFoo
    {
        foos = bars;
    }

The issue here is that if H is a value type, the covariance is not exactly what you'd expect, as IEnumerable<MyStruct> actually returns the value types whereas IEnumerable<IFoo> has to return boxed instances. You can use an explicit Cast<IFoo> to get around this, if necessary.

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Thank you, that was the missing piece of information I needed. –  Tom Oct 18 '12 at 19:55
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You simply need a cast to IEnumerable<IFoo> in there:

public void DoTestOne<H>(IEnumerable<H> bars) where H : IFoo
{
    foos = (IEnumerable<IFoo>)bars;
}

Edit courtesy of Dan Bryant: using foos = bars.Cast<IFoo>() instead of above circumvents the InvalidCastException when H is a struct.

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This leads to a runtime exception if you pass in some structs, right? (Not a criticism, just trying to remember how it works.) –  Rawling Oct 18 '12 at 19:51
    
@Rawling you're right, I just checked -- InvalidCastException. –  McGarnagle Oct 18 '12 at 19:55
1  
@dbaseman, I actually thought this syntax would work, but apparently not. The concept is sound, though; just use .Cast<IFoo>() instead. –  Dan Bryant Oct 18 '12 at 19:57
    
@DanBryant: The .Cast method will use the non-generic IEnumerable, whose associated non-generic IEnumerator will copy value-type instance to a new instance of its corresponding heap-object type return a reference to that latter instance. Its usage is only necessary if the type parameter for IEnumerable<T> is not known to be a class type. In cases where the compiler knows whether T is a class type or structure type, one could use overloads DoTestOne<T>(T bars) where T:IEnumerable<IFoo> and DoTestOne<T>(IEnumerable<T> bars) where T:struct {DoTestOne(bars.Cast<IFoo>);} –  supercat Oct 19 '12 at 14:52
    
@DanBryant: If one has an IEnumerable<T> where T:IFoo, and where T is known to be either a structure or class type, the compiler will select the correct overload. If, however, T is an unconstrained generic, the compiler can't pick an overload. One could write a method to make the determination at run-time pretty efficiently, but I don't know any way to write overloads so that the latter method would only get called in cases where static type determination would fail on the first two methods. –  supercat Oct 19 '12 at 14:56
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You forgot a cast in your return or a "class" identifier in your generic constraint. What your doing is of course possible, reference below.

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970.aspx

where T : <interface name>

The type argument must be or implement the specified interface.
Multiple interface constraints can be specified. The constraining interface can also be generic.
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Within the .net Runtime, every value type has an associated heap object type with the same name. In some contexts, the value type will be used; in other contexts, the heap type. When a storage location (variable, parameter, return value, field, or array slot) of value type is declared, that storage location will hold the actual contents of that type. When a storage location of class type is declared, it will hold either null or a reference to a heap object that is stored elsewhere. Interface-type storage locations are treated like reference-type ones, and hold heap references even if some (or all) of the implementations of the interface are actually value types.

An attempt to store a value type into a reference-type storage location will cause the system to create a new instance of the heap type associated with the value type, copy all the fields from the original storage location to corresponding fields in the new instance, and store a reference to that instance, a process called "boxing". An attempt to cast a heap reference to a value-type storage location will check whether it refers to an instance of the heap type associated with the value type; if it does, the fields of the heap object will be copied ("unboxed") into the corresponding ones in the value-type storage location.

Although it may look as though a type like System.Int32 derives from System.Object, that's only half true. There is a heap object type System.Int32, which does indeed derive from System.Object, but a variable of type System.Int32 doesn't hold a reference to such an object. Instead, such a variable holds the actual data associated with that integer; the data itself is just a collection of bits, and doesn't derive from anything.

If one thinks of interface-type storage locations as holding "Something derived from System.Object which implements interface _", then instances of any class type which implements that interface are an instance of that type, but instances of a value types--even if they are convertible to other types--are not instances of any other types. Code which uses an IEnumerator<IFoo> doesn't just want its Current method to return something which could be convertible to an IFoo, or implements IFoo; it wants it to return something that is a derivative of Object that implements IFoo. Consequently, for an IEnumerable<T> to substitute for an IEnumerable<IFoo>, it's necessary that T be constrained both to implement IFoo and to be a proper derivative of System.Object.

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A reference to a boxed instance is a kind of reference, but the type referred to is the same type as the unboxed value type. There are not actually two different CLR types. Also, the value type really does derive from Object (in fact, from ValueType). In particular, methods derived from Object on a value type are not called using a boxed instance; you instead pass a typed (not boxed) reference to the value as the 'this'. Granted, these are subtle distinctions; the main thing is to not confuse the notion of a Type with the notion of different kinds of references. –  Dan Bryant Oct 19 '12 at 17:42
    
@DanBryant: Within the CLR is directed to create a storage location of type System.Int32, it creates something very different from a System.Int32 heap object. Both kinds of things are described using the same Type, but they behave differently. For example, copying passing a variable of type List<string>.Enumerator to a method which expects an IEnumerator<string> will pass a snapshot of the enumerator's state, while passing a reference to a heap object of type List<string>.Enumerator to such a method will pass a direct ("live") reference to the state. –  supercat Oct 19 '12 at 18:33
    
@DanBryant: There are times that having some form of automatic boxing can be helpful (e.g. handling the arguments to String.Format), but the "unified type system" model does not accurately match reality; rather than deriding as "evil" anything which would expose the differences between the model and reality, I think it would be more helpful to recognize that it's useful to have value-type objects whose behavior differs from class objects. While it's useful to be able to capture the state of an arbitrary value-type storage location in a class object, that doesn't mean... –  supercat Oct 19 '12 at 18:48
    
...the class object and value-type storage location should be considered equivalent. Had generics existed from the beginning in .net, it would have been helpful to regard value types and class types as existing in separate "universes", but allow a value type T to be implicitly converted to a class type ValueHolder<T> with an exposed field Value. A ValueHolder<T> would not implement interfaces which were implemented by T, but a struct T implementing IFoo could if desired define an implicit conversion to IFoo. Generics didn't exist from the beginning, though; such is life. –  supercat Oct 19 '12 at 19:03
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