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When transforming files with a self-implemented burrows-wheeler algorithm my program gets stuck when reading files with filesize above 59 kB. Basically I'm starting my program in terminal:

./BW encode 4 < test 

where 4 stands for 4*1024 bytes. As told before when processing files (raw data, textfiles etc.) with filesize under 59 kB no problems occure.

code where data is processed and send to stdout:

void encodeBlock(unsigned char* str,long length){
    unsigned int i, out_rownum;
    unsigned char **str_matr, *out_str, *prnt_rt_str2, *prnt_rt_str1;
    str_matr = (unsigned char**) calloc(length,sizeof(unsigned char*));
    out_str = (unsigned char*) calloc(length+1,sizeof(unsigned char));
    // make matrix with rotationstrings of str (by saving pointer to first character)
    for(i=0;i<(unsigned int) length;i++){
        str_matr[i] = &str[i];
    }
    // sorting matrix
    glob_strt = &str[0];
    glob_length = length;
    qsort(str_matr,length,sizeof(unsigned char*),strCmpEnc);
    out_str[length] = '\0';
    for(i=0;i<(unsigned int) length;i++){
        prnt_rt_str1 = printRotStr(length,&str[0],str_matr[i]);
        prnt_rt_str2 = printRotStr(length,&prnt_rt_str1[0],&prnt_rt_str1[length-1]);
        if(memcmp(str,prnt_rt_str2,length) == 0){
            out_rownum = i;
        }
        out_str[i] = prnt_rt_str1[length-1];
    }    
    printf("(%d ",out_rownum);
    fwrite((unsigned char*) out_str, 1, length, stdout);
    printf(")\n");
    free(prnt_rt_str1);
    free(prnt_rt_str2);
    free(str_matr);
    free(out_str);
}

and code where data is received from stdin

void encode(unsigned short int num, unsigned int block_size){
    long b_length,length;
    unsigned char* buffer;  
    freopen(NULL, "rb", stdin);
    buffer = (unsigned char*) calloc(block_size+1,sizeof(unsigned char));
    length = fread((unsigned char*) buffer, 1, block_size, stdin);
    if(length == 0){
        // file empty
    }else{
        b_length = length;
        printf("##B-W:%ld##\n",length);
        while(length == b_length){
            buffer[block_size] = '\0';
            encodeBlock(buffer,length);
            length = fread((unsigned char*) buffer, 1, block_size, stdin);      
        }
        if(length != 0){
            printf("##B-W:%ld##\n",length); 
            buffer[length] = '\0';
            encodeBlock(buffer,length);
        }
    }
    free(buffer);
}    

When it gets stuck it usually terminates and 'Killed' appears on screen. I'm working on linux OS.

Result using valgrind: The program gets stuck and my whole system hangs. I'm not able to see any debugging result because I have to shutdown my system manually.

UPDATE: The reason behind the blocked reading (after 59kB) was that there was no space left on the heap due of many mem leaks. I solved this problem and finally reading works fine.

share|improve this question
    
if(memcmp(str,prnt_rt_str2,length) == 0){ goes beyond your allocated memory. It adresses (length-1)(length) characters. Update: That should have been (length+1) –  wildplasser Oct 18 '12 at 20:12
1  
Run the program under valgrind and fix the very first place where it tells you you accessed uninitialized or unallocated memory. Repeat. –  Zack Oct 18 '12 at 20:13
1  
Well, 19 pairs of eyeballs are probably quicker. –  wildplasser Oct 18 '12 at 20:14
    
@wildplasser;Zack Ok thanks but shouldn't I get a segment fault error than? –  user1745184 Oct 18 '12 at 20:16
    
If I understanding correctly, you are setting up two stringpointer arrays, with each pointer pointing to an individual character of the input string. With the only goal to permute/shuffle the input string ? –  wildplasser Oct 18 '12 at 20:21
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1 Answer

When it gets stuck it usually terminates and 'Killed' appears on screen.

This means, most likely, it runs out of the memory limit and is killed by the kernel.

Do use valgrind, honestly. Your code is too painful to read for humans to be able to point at the fatal error (non-fatal, but still annoying ones abound).

share|improve this answer
    
Anyways I tried using valgrind without any results... The program gets stuck and my whole system hangs. I'm not able to see any debugging result because I have to shut down my system manually. –  user1745184 Oct 18 '12 at 21:31
    
@user1745184 Are you saying that you have to shut down the computer while running your application under valgrind? As far as I know, Ctrl+C should interrupt the valgrind process just as it would any other. –  HonkyTonk Oct 19 '12 at 9:57
    
Even if I run my program in the terminal my computer freezes. –  user1745184 Oct 19 '12 at 10:22
    
@user1745184 Run it in Valgrind with a small parameter (like 4) so that you can find the memory leak (or other problems.) –  Nikos C. Oct 20 '12 at 16:24
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