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I just started learning Python, and I'm stuck in this problem: I have a DNA sequence, and I need to return its complementary sequence. For example, if I have ATTGCA, it should return TAACGT. This is, replace A by T, T by A, C by G and G by C. It's an exercise, and I'm not supposed to use string methods. Everything I tried until now, return me 'T' as answer. Seems it only recognize the first letter, then stops. How can I do it?

I tried:

>>> def get_complementary_sequence(dna):
    for char in dna:
        if char == 'A':
            return 'T'
        elif char == 'T':
            return 'A'
        elif char == 'C':
            return 'G'
        elif char == 'G':
            return 'C'


>>> get_complementary_sequence('ATTGCA')
'T'

And also tried:

def get_complementary_sequence(dna):
    sequence = ""
    for nucleotide in dna:
        if nucleotide == 'A':
            return sequence + 'T'
        elif nucleotide == 'T':
            return sequence + 'A'
        elif nucleotide == 'C':
            return sequence + 'G'
        elif nucleotide == 'G':
            return sequence + 'C'
        return sequence


>>> get_complementary_sequence('ATTGCA')
'T'
share|improve this question
8  
Everything I tried until now -> then show us what you tried? –  Rohit Jain Oct 18 '12 at 20:09
    
>>> def get_complementary_sequence(dna): for char in dna: if char == 'A': return 'T' elif char == 'T': return 'A' elif char == 'C': return 'G' elif char == 'G': return 'C' >>> get_complementary_sequence('ATTGCA') 'T' >>> –  Luiz Maurício R. Menezes Oct 18 '12 at 20:56
    
Post this code in your question.. Edit your question. –  Rohit Jain Oct 18 '12 at 20:57
    
Question edited with the codes! –  Luiz Maurício R. Menezes Oct 18 '12 at 21:19

5 Answers 5

try a dictionary, that way you'll also don't need the if's and elif's:

In [45]: dic={'A':'T','T':'A','C':'G','G':'C'}

In [46]: strs="ATTGCA"

In [47]: ''.join(dic[x] for x in strs)
Out[47]: 'TAACGT'

or using map():

In [52]: ''.join(map(dic.get,strs))
Out[52]: 'TAACGT'
share|improve this answer
2  
join is a "string method", so I wonder if this meets the requirements. Though I suppose one could argue that even + is a string method (__add__). –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 18 '12 at 20:16
1  
@LaurenceGonsalves IMHO the string method he's concerned with is replace(). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 18 '12 at 20:19
    
Maybe. He said "I'm not supposed to use string methods" not "I'm not supposed to use replace()". –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 18 '12 at 20:24
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: I would have been more concerned about his using "ATAGGTCTCTTA".translate({65: 84, 67: 71, 84: 65, 71: 67}). replace() would have been difficult to use because of the symmetric replacements... –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 18 '12 at 20:26
    
@TimPietzcker I never knew about this method ,thanks for that. But this only works in py3k I guess? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 18 '12 at 20:38

A string is also a sequence of characters, so you can iterate through it:

for char in sequence:
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Here is an equivalent of Ashwini Chaudhary's elegant solution which maybe more comprehensible for beginners:

complements = {'A': 'T',
               'T': 'A',
               'C': 'G',
               'G': 'C'}
dna_sequence = 'ATTGCA'
new_sequence = []
for char in dna_sequence:
    new_sequence.append(complements[char])
# new_sequence is now ['T', 'A', 'A', 'C', 'G', 'T']
result = ''.join(new_sequence) # result in 'TAACGT'
share|improve this answer

Another way using dictionaries, entirely without string methods :)

trans = {'A':'T','T':'A','C':'G','G':'C'}
with open("temp.txt", "w") as outfile:
    for character in mystring:
        outfile.write(trans[character])
with open("temp.txt") as infile:
    result = infile.read()
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not even using the + operator :) –  Thane Brimhall Oct 18 '12 at 20:42
    
+1 why doesn't this came to my mind :), but you can reduce your solution to this –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 18 '12 at 20:44
    
@AshwiniChaudhary: Haha, good one :) –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 18 '12 at 20:45

This solution is easy to understand. Hope it helps.

def get_complement(nucleotide):
    """ (str) ->str
    """

    sequence = ""
    for char in nucleotide:
        if char == "A":
            sequence = sequence + "T"
        if char == "T":
            sequence = sequence + "A"
        if char == "G":
            sequence = sequence + "C"
        if char == "C":
            sequence = sequence + "G"

    return sequence
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