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I am writing a parser for a set of CFG. (Note: The RHS can ONLY be an uppercase letter)

/*ignore declaration and stuff, here's the main part of the code */

void
start():
{
}
{
    (
     <UPPER_CHAR>
     <ARROW>
     <STRING>
     ( <PIPE> <STRING> )*
    )*
}


TOKEN:
{
 <ARROW: "=>" >
|
 <PIPE: "|">
|
 <UPPER_CHAR: (["A"-"Z"])>
}

TOKEN: {<STRING: (<LETTER> |  <DIGIT> | <SYMBOL>)+ > }

This obviously missed some edge cases, some which include:

A => A | a | D E => e

So what did I do wrong?

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1 Answer 1

I guess SYMBOL includes "=" and ">" but not "|". In that case. STRING will match the whole of " D E => e".

Why do you want STRING at all? Why not do something like this.

void start() : {} {
   (
      <UPPER_CHAR> <ARROW>
      choices()
   )*
}
void choices() : {} {
      choice() ( <PIPE> choice())*
}
void choice() : {} {
    LOOKAHEAD(<UPPER_CHAR> <ARROW> )
    {}
 |
    (<UPPER_CHAR> | <LOWER_CHAR>) choice()
 |
    {}
}

The reason I used recursion for choice is that there is no way to use syntactic lookahead to exit a loop. I.e. what you want is (<UPPER_CHAR> | <LOWER_CHAR>)*, but you want to get out of this loop as soon as the next two tokens are <UPPER_CHAR> <ARROW>.

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