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can anyone help me out with this code.. All i want to do is copy display the character arrays initialized in the main function am pretty new to cpp and i can't figure a way out

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class base1
{
public:
void setname(char *name);
void setpubl(char *publisher);
void setauth(char *author);
char getname();
char getpubl();
char getauth();
private:
char init_name[50], init_publ[50], init_auth[50];

};

void base1::setname(char *name)
{
int i=0;
while(init_name[i] != '\0')
{
init_name[i]=name[i];
i++;
}
}

void base1::setpubl(char *publisher)
{
int j=0;
while(init_publ[j] != '\0')
{
init_publ[j]=publisher[j];
j++;
}
}

void base1::setauth(char *author)
{
int k=0;
while(init_auth[k] != '\0')
{
init_auth[k]=author[k];
k++;
}

}

const char* base1::getname() const
{
return init_name;
}

const char* base1::getpubl() const
{
return init_publ;
}
const char* base1::getauth() const
{
return init_auth;
}
/*
base1::base1()
{
init_name[0]=0;
init_publ[0]=0;
init_auth[0]=0;
}*/

int main()
{
base1 hello;
char name[]="cpp";
char publisher[]="dreamworks";
char author[]="random";
hello.setname(name);
hello.setpubl(publisher);
hello.setauth(author);
cout<<hello.getname()<<endl;
cout<<hello.getpubl()<<endl;
cout<<hello.getauth()<<endl;
return 0;
}

when i try to compile it it gives me loads of errors. can some one help me out. i am using g++

errors:

copychar.cpp:49:13: error: prototype for ‘const char* base1::getname() const’ does not match any in class ‘base1’

copychar.cpp:10:6: error: candidate is: char base1::getname()

copychar.cpp:54:13: error: prototype for ‘const char* base1::getpubl() const’ does not match any in class ‘base1’

copychar.cpp:11:6: error: candidate is: char base1::getpubl()

copychar.cpp:58:13: error: prototype for ‘const char* base1::getauth() const’ does not match any in class ‘base1’

copychar.cpp:12:6: error: candidate is: char base1::getauth()

when i am using the following code, only the first character of each string is getting displayed

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class base1
{
public:
void setname(char *name);
void setpubl(char *publisher);
void setauth(char *author);
char getname();
char getpubl();
char getauth();
private:
char init_name[50], init_publ[50], init_auth[50];

};

void base1::setname(char *name)
{
int i=0;
while(name[i] != '\0')
{
init_name[i]=name[i];
i++;
}
}

void base1::setpubl(char *publisher)
{
int j=0;
while(publisher[j] != '\0')
{
init_publ[j]=publisher[j];
j++;
}
}

void base1::setauth(char *author)
{
int k=0;
while(author[k] != '\0')
{
init_auth[k]=author[k];
k++;
}

}

char base1::getname()
{
return *init_name;
}

char base1::getpubl()
{
return *init_publ;
}
char base1::getauth()
{
return *init_auth;
}
/*
base1::base1()
{
init_name[0]=0;
init_publ[0]=0;
init_auth[0]=0;
}*/

int main()
{
base1 hello;
char name[]="cpp";
char publisher[]="dreamworks";
char author[]="random";
hello.setname(name);
hello.setpubl(publisher);
hello.setauth(author);
cout<<hello.getname()<<endl;
cout<<hello.getpubl()<<endl;
cout<<hello.getauth()<<endl;
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What are the compiler errors, and where? –  Coding Mash Oct 18 '12 at 20:40
4  
And now that you have seen how hard this is, please use std::string instead. –  Bo Persson Oct 18 '12 at 20:48
    
Please do not edit the question on such a mass scale. It renders all the answers incorrect. –  Coding Mash Oct 18 '12 at 20:54
    
@CodingMash sorry :| got the solution. thanks :) –  Kiran Vemuri Oct 18 '12 at 21:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your loops are wrong, not

void base1::setpubl(char *publisher)
{
    int j=0;
    while(init_publ[j] != '\0')
    {
        init_publ[j]=publisher[j];
        j++;
    }
}

but

void base1::setpubl(char *publisher)
{
    int j=0;
    while(publisher[j] != '\0')
    {
        init_publ[j]=publisher[j];
        j++;
    }
    init_publ[j] = '\0'; // ensure destination string is null terminated
}

Your loop should check for the end of the publisher string that you pass into the function, not for the end of the init_publ string. That doesn't make much sense since you haven't given that string a value yet.

Same for the other loops.

Also look at this

char getname();

and this

const char* base1::getname() const

See the difference? First you say getname is char, then you say it's const char* and const. You have to be consistent. The second one is correct, replace

char getname();

with

const char* getname() const;

Same with getauth and getpubl.

share|improve this answer
    
am getting the same errors with them! there's no change! –  Kiran Vemuri Oct 18 '12 at 20:45
    
@KiranVemuri Added another suggestion. –  john Oct 18 '12 at 20:51
    
thanks a lot , that's working. –  Kiran Vemuri Oct 18 '12 at 20:59
    
@KiranVemuri Glad you accepted my answer but the code I posted is not actually correct. PyotrNycz spotted an error which I had not. I've corrected my code to ensure that the strings you are copying to are null terminated. –  john Oct 18 '12 at 21:03

The prototypes of your getter functions do not match. You have declared the getters as this..

char getname();

And you implement it like this.

const char* base1::getauth() const

make their protypes same, like this.

const char* getauth() const ;

and implement it like this.

const char* base1::getauth() const
{
  //code here
}

And similarly for all getter functions.

share|improve this answer
  • correct your compile errors one by one
    • read every error carefully
    • check google/compiler documentation if do not understand it
    • still do not understand - then ask for this very error - what does it mean in your case
  • unit test your code
  • when your program will not pass unit tests (and it will not) debug your code and correct logic errors one by one

Run these steps every time you must write something. This is the best way to improve your programming skills - good advice from others and good lecture are not enough.

I can give you some tips - but would that help for future, for not so obvious bugs?

Just one tip: char string must be ended by '\0', are your strings contain this last character after copying?

share|improve this answer
    
If that's the only way to learn code then I must have been faking it all these years. –  john Oct 18 '12 at 20:53
    
But that's a good tip, which no-one else seems to have caught. –  john Oct 18 '12 at 20:54
    
@john you are right - corrected my answer to be less radical... –  PiotrNycz Oct 18 '12 at 20:57
    
Maybe before 'correct your compiler errors' you should explicitly list 'read your compile errors' since that seems to be the problem here. –  bames53 Oct 18 '12 at 20:58
    
@bames53 - good point –  PiotrNycz Oct 18 '12 at 21:02
  • Your setXXX functions taking char * parameters should probably be taking const char* instead.
void setname(const char *name);
  • Your getXXX functions are declared as missing the const qualifiers, but definitions are const.
  • Your getXXX functions are declared as returning a char, but definitions are returning const char*.
const char* getname() const;
  • Your setXXX functions are checking for null terminators in the destination rather than the source, causing them to not copy in any characters at all.
  • Your setXXX functions should probably be using a for loop rather than a while loop
  • You do no buffer overrun checks at all.
void base1::setname(const char *name) 
{
  int i=0;
  for( ; name[i]!='\0' && i<49; ++i)
    init_name[i]=name[i];
  init_name[i] = '\0';  
}
  • Your class has no constructor, so members might be initialized randomly
base1::base1()
:init_name(), init_publ(), init_auth()
{}
share|improve this answer

You have to do the while thing on the argument :

void base1::setpubl(char *publisher)
{
     int j=0;
     while(publisher[j] != '\0')
     //...

It is the same for all your methods

share|improve this answer

use the string functions, that's what they're there for (unless this is your homework in which case that's not what SO is here for)

However, your main problem is that when you copy the data to the class arrays, you stop when the destination array is a null - and in most C++ environments, declaring an array will not initialise it with nulls, most time you don't want the performance hit just to blank an array you will fill with real data.

So copy until the input is a null character instead, or the destination array is full.

share|improve this answer
    
got an assignment.. and hence –  Kiran Vemuri Oct 18 '12 at 20:47

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