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**UPDATED with a better example

Let's have two statements

  1. (value > 15)
  2. (value > 25)

And a list of items with the following values

  • 10
  • 20
  • 30

This is what a truth table would give

Item  Value  (value > 15)  (value > 25)
----  -----  ------------  ------------
1     10     FALSE         FALSE
2     20     TRUE          FALSE
3     30     TRUE          TRUE

Example 1

Where ALL of the following are TRUE
   value > 15
   value > 25

This one is easy and we get the following

Where (value > 15) AND (value > 25)

The result is then a single value of 30

Example 2

Where NONE of the following are TRUE
   value > 15
   value > 25

This is where I am not sure of what to generate.

This would be "simple" as it is only a NOT of the whole expression

Where NOT ((value > 15) AND (value > 25))

However, the result is then two values (10 and 20)

From what someone would think of NONE of the two statements would be something like:

Where NOT ((value > 15) OR (value > 25))

And the result would be that 10 is returned.

What is the correct meaning of NONE here?

share|improve this question
    
+1. Your question looks perfectly fine to me. It's actually very nicely written. –  Ken White Oct 18 '12 at 20:48
    
This has to be taken in the context of a table of values. I think the correct assumption would be that no value would be returned. –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 20:55
    
Look up De Morgan’s laws. –  Josh Lee Oct 18 '12 at 21:14
    
Well, according to DeMorgan we have ! (A * B) = !A + !B... however it feel more natural having ! (A + B) –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can represent "none of (a, b, etc) is true" by either

(NOT a) AND (NOT b) AND (NOT etc) 

or

NOT (a OR b OR etc)

Either will work.

In your case, you could say NOT ((value > 15) OR (value > 25)). Only 10 matches.

share|improve this answer
    
I've updated my question to be a bit more "logical". –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 21:20
    
@Stécy: I've just updated my answer to match. :) –  cHao Oct 18 '12 at 21:23
    
So NONE (a,b) is not the same as NOT (a AND b)? –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 21:26
    
I guess DeMorgan's laws are not applicable for NONE? –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 21:26
    
NONE is not a logical operator. :) It basically means "all these are false". And DeMorgan does cover that case (at least for two conditions); (NOT a) AND (NOT B) == NOT (a OR B). –  cHao Oct 18 '12 at 21:30

None in this instance means NOT on both of the instances, AND'd together.

   Where NOT(value > 15) AND NOT (value > 25)

Using Demorgan's Law, we can extract the NOT to mean:

   Where NOT ((value > 15) OR (value > 25))

Which is the second statement in your Example 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, my first example? This is not equivalent... This would return two values (10 and 20) –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 20:49
    
@Stécy Sorry, I'll clarify. I meant your first example towards the end. –  Igor Oct 18 '12 at 20:49
    
Well, not like the first result of the 2nd example. It produced 10 and 30. –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 20:52
    
@Stécy Yes, you're right, sorry. I was misreading it. –  Igor Oct 18 '12 at 20:54
    
Since I've updated my question to be more logical would you take a look at it again? TY –  Stécy Oct 18 '12 at 21:21

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