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What is the simplest way to compile/execute an assembler file on Windows? Would one option be to simply embed within a Visual Studio C++ project and use __asm tags?

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closed as not a real question by Bo Persson, BЈовић, Andrey, jsalonen, Linus Kleen Oct 19 '12 at 7:28

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1 Answer 1

I recommend you to NOT do that. Instead, write assembly language program separately in a .asm file, compile it into an object file(or .lib file is also OK). Then link it with your program. This will ease tracking bugs in your code. using __asm is a bad alternative to writing separate assembly language file.

You can use any number of assemblers : MASM, NASM, FASM etc etc. Just keep in mind the calling conventions used by C/C++ program and replicate that in your code in MASM/NASM/FASM.

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Ok so I am asking how do you "compile it into an object..... etc" on windows- is there something I can install to use as a command line? –  user997112 Oct 18 '12 at 21:52
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you can check out masm or nasm (both are available for free online) and then see how to compile into an object file. Both assemblers are driven through the command line. Check their manuals for more info :-) –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 21:54
    
Thanks Prototype Shark –  user997112 Oct 18 '12 at 22:51
    
@user997112 yw no problem man. Selecting the answer is SO's way of saying thank-you :-P. Up-votes aren't affecting my score man. I reached the 200 REPUTATION cap limit. –  Aniket Oct 18 '12 at 22:52

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