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Running my app through callgrind revealed that this line dwarfed everything else by a factor of about 10,000. I'm probably going to redesign around it, but it got me wondering; Is there a better way to do it?

Here's what I'm doing at the moment:

int i = 1;
while
(
    (
        (*(buffer++) == 0xffffffff && ++i) || 
        (i = 1)
    )
    &&
    i < desiredLength + 1
    &&
    buffer < bufferEnd
);

It's looking for the offset of the first chunk of desiredLength 0xffffffff values in a 32 bit unsigned int array.

It's significantly faster than any implementations I could come up with involving an inner loop. But it's still too damn slow.

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7  
One thing that can be optimized is the readability of that line... –  Mysticial Oct 18 '12 at 22:00
4  
Have you tried using std::search_n - std::search_n(buffer, bufferEnd, desiredLength, 0xffffffff)? I imagine that under the hood it could (potentially) leverage SIMD. –  Porges Oct 18 '12 at 22:05
1  
You could be twice as fast by using 64-bit integers and do some small corrections after the loop, assuming that the minimum number of contiguous 0xffffffff is at least 2. –  zneak Oct 18 '12 at 22:06
2  
Couldn't you skip by desiredLength instead of 1, and then search from there instead? I.e. if desiredLength is 10, and neither buffer[0] nor buffer[10] match, you don't need to look at buffer[3]. –  DSM Oct 18 '12 at 22:06
1  
And to take the 64-bit integer idea a step further, you can also use 128-bit SSE. –  Mysticial Oct 18 '12 at 22:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You tagged c++ so I assume you have STL algorithms available:

std::search_n(buffer, bufferEnd, desiredLength, 0xffffffff);
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I'd go for the search_n suggestion, too, because I'm pretty sure it does this properly. It's actually pretty easy, and it can be sped up basically by a factor of desired_length. unless the target values are really dense in the array.

Here's the idea: if you have K consecutive instances of a value starting at position I, then it must be the case that position I + K - 1 contains that value. So you check that first; if it doesn't, then the earliest position which might contain the K consecutive values is I + K, so you can restart the algorithm there.

If, on the other hand, you find the value at I + K - 1, then you scan backwards until you either reach I (in which case you succeeded), or you reach some position J - 1 which doesn't contain the target value. In the latter case, you know there are target values from J to I + K - 1, so you now check J + K - 1. If that works, you only have to scan backwards to I + K. If it doesn't work, you restart the algorithm at J + K.

Most of the time, you'll only look at every K'th position in the vector. For large K, that's a big win.

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Try to use memcmp from C standard library. Modern compilers shall have very optimized implementations of memxxx functions making the most speed out of modern CPUs.

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I don't think memcmp is applicable here. –  Alastair Oct 18 '12 at 22:14
    
@Alastair With predefined lengths - why not, it can be faster than std::search_n. Depends on implementation. –  Rost Oct 18 '12 at 22:21
    
But it doesn't do the same thing as search_n! I think you need to explain further. –  Alastair Oct 18 '12 at 22:28
    
Of course, it shall be used with e.g. memchr, something like BigBoss suggested. –  Rost Oct 18 '12 at 22:46

Just a thought but you're iterating over the int array one at a time right? Think about this, if *(buffer) != 0xffffffff and buffer[desiredLength-1] != 0xffffffff then you can be sure that there's no point in checking in between so you can just move buffer on by desiredLength rather than just by 1 which may significantly improve your speed if desiredLength is much larger than one. Of course it complicates your function because:

  1. If both *(buffer) and buffer[desiredLength-1] equal 0xffffffff then you can't assume it's contiguous between them so you'll still need to check that.
  2. If *(buffer) doesn't equal 0xffffffff but buffer[desiredLength-1] does equal 0xffffffff then you've got to track to the beginning of the 0xffffffff sequence.
  3. You've got to ensure you don't overrun the buffer when you check buffer[desiredLength-1]

A bit more complex but it may speed things up. Hope that makes sense.

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Take a cookie for exploiting the data property that's being searched for. –  rvalue Oct 18 '12 at 22:37

If I want to implement this I will do it using memchr and memcmp:

bool found = false;
std::vector<unsigned char> tmp(desiredLength*sizeof(uint32_t), 0xFF);
while( true ) {
    void* p = memchr(bufferStart, 0xFF,
        (bufferEnd-bufferStart-desiredLength) * sizeof(uint32_t));
    if( !p ) break;
    if( !memcmp(p, &tmp[0], desiredLength * sizeof(uint32_t)) ) {
        found = true;
        break;
    }
}

Also you can use std::search_n that may be better optimized than your own code

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1  
desiredLength is length in 32-bit ints, not in chars –  Rost Oct 18 '12 at 22:17
    
@Rost so much thanks for the comment! I correct my answer –  BigBoss Oct 18 '12 at 22:23

For when std::search_n isn't available:

int i = 1;
while
(
    (
        i == 1
        &&
        buffer < bufferEnd
        &&
        (
            (
                *buffer == desired
                &&
                *(buffer + desiredLength - 1) == desired
                &&
                (i = 3)
            )
            ||
            (buffer += desiredLength && (i = 1))
        )
    )
    ||
    (
        i == 2
        &&
        (
            (
                buffer > arr
                &&
                (*(--buffer) == desired)
            )
            ||
            (i = 3)
        )
    )
    ||
    (
        i >= 3
        &&
        buffer < bufferEnd
        &&
        (
            (
                *(buffer++) == desired
                &&
                (i++ || true)
            )
            ||
            (i = 1)
        )
        &&
        (
            i < 3
            ||
            i - 3 < desiredLength + 1
        )
    )
);
buffer -= i - 4;

if (buffer > bufferEnd - (i-3))
    buffer = bufferEnd;

Returns identical results only slightly slower than std:search_n:

buffer = std::search_n(buffer, bufferEnd-1, desiredLength, desired);
if (buffer == bufferEnd-1)
    buffer = bufferEnd;
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