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I'm probably missing something simple - but I can'tseem to get this to work. I have a simple audio delay - with an fixed array size of [65536] - and it works perfectly - the problem is - if I try and make the array size - either shorter or longer - it bombs out!

Here's the working code:

    float b[65536]; // initialisation
    int p, r0, r1;
    float len, d, feedback; // d = decimal part of length
    int leni; // integer value of length

    if (len > 65534) len = 65534; 
    else if (len < 1) len = 1;
    leni = (int) len; // float to INT conversions are cpu intensive. 

    d = len - leni;
    r0 = p - leni; // loop
    r1 = r0 - 1;
    if (r0 < 0) r0 += 65536;
    if (r1 < 0) r1 += 65536;

 output = b[r0] + d * (b[r1] - b[r0]);
    b[p] = input + output * feedback;
    p++;
    if (p > 65535) p = 0;

Now here's the non-working code:

    float b[16384]; // initialisation
    int p, r0, r1;
    float len, d, feedback; // d = decimal part of length
    int leni; // integer value of length

    if (len > 16382) len = 16382;
    else if (len < 1) len = 1;
    leni = (int) len; // float to INT conversions are cpu intensive. 

    d = len - leni;
    r0 = p - leni; // loop
    r1 = r0 - 1;
    if (r0 < 0) r0 += 16384;
    if (r1 < 0) r1 += 16384;

 output = b[r0] + d * (b[r1] - b[r0]);
    b[p] = input + output * feedback;
    p++;
    if (p > 16383) p = 0;

Can't figure out what to do, am I wrapping it wrong - or is 65536 a special int case?

Thanks in advace Andrew

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1 Answer 1

Your code is a bit hard to follow -- eg I'm not clear why you have floating point numbers that need to be changed to integers, what the initial values of variables like len are or where the loop occurs. I'm not even sure what language it is (python?) and maybe those things are obvious to someone who knows the language, in which case I apologize for my ignorance.

I can, however, speculate that fact that it works for 65536 probably has something to do with 65536 being a power of two, and somehow that property works around whatever other bugs you have.

I'm not going to try to fix your code, because, as I said, I can't follow it -- again, sorry. Instead, see my answer here, which tells you how to write a delay and an echo. It's in c-like psuedo-code which should be easy to port, and it's very few lines of code:

how to add echo effect on audio file using objective-c

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Not Python - c++ actually. The float is converted to an integer to obtain a frational delay-length - and that is in turn used to interpolate the delay-line - the code above is for linear interpolation btw. Sorry if the code is a bit unreadable - the "working version" of the code was not written by me - it's from a tutorial actually - but they did not state how to change the max array length. I tried other powers of 2 - didn't work. Coded a rather big reverb with this code. What a pain - think I need to wrap the variables differently. Thanks for trying to help though! –  ichad.c Oct 22 '12 at 21:31
1  
That's c++? Well then, some code is missing. For example, how is len initialized? What is input? What is a class function and what is a local function, etc. Also, what do you mean by "bombs out"? noise? crash? if it crashes, how/where? Either way, you should def trace to make sure that r0 and r1 are always in bound, because they look very suspicious to me. –  Bjorn Roche Oct 23 '12 at 3:05
    
Sorry, I left out all class declerations. The code is for an SDK (synthedit) within another SDK (Steinberg VST) - so if I posted the whole thing - it would be a two pager atleast. The buffer b[], the write pointer 'p', and the two read pointers 'r0' and 'r1' are in the class decleration. I think your right about r0 and r1 - another implementation - that's looks alot like mine - only wraps one of the pointers. Will investigate. By bombs out - it doesn't crash - it causes heavy noise at Nyquist - after one cycle of the array. Still dang strange that 65536 works perfectly - but nothing else. –  ichad.c Oct 24 '12 at 11:50

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