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This is my first question to Stack Overflow. Apologies in advance if I am breaking some rules.

I have been reading Chapter 14 of Intermediate Perl, 2nd ed., which discusses testing Perl modules and using features from Test::More. I am referring to code published directly in this book in the Section titled "Adding Our First Tests".

For some background, in this chapter, a sample Animal class is created in a module with the same name. This class has a simple speak method which looks like this:

sub speak {
    my $class = shift;
    print "a $class goes ", $class->sound, "!\n";
}

The sound method is a simple string returned for an particular Animal, so for example, a Horse's sound method will be simply sub sound { "neigh" } and it's speak method should output the following:

A Horse goes neigh!

The problem I'm running into is the following: in the testing code I've created at ./Animal/t/Animal.t , I am instructed to use bare blocks and Test::More::is to test that the speak method is working. The code looks like this in the test file:

[test code snip]
{
    package Foofle;
    use parent qw(Animal);

    sub sound { 'foof' }
    is( Foofle->speak, 
        "A Foofle goes foof!\n", 
        "An Animal subclass does the right thing"
    );
}

The test fails. I ran all the Build commands, but when running "Build test", I get this failure for the Animal test:

Undefined subroutine &Foofle::is called at t/Animal.t line 28.

When I try to explicitly use Test::More::is instead of just plain is, the test still fails with the following message:

#   Failed test 'An Animal subclass does the right thing'
#   at t/Animal.t line 28.
#          got: '1'
#     expected: 'A Foofle goes foof!
# '

My methods appear to be defined exactly as I explained. I think the first error is a scope issue because of the bare blocks, but not 100% sure. The second error I am unsure about, because if I were to create a Foofle class as a child of Animal and called speak on it, I would not get a 1 response, but rather the expected output.

Would someone be able to help out on what I may be doing wrong? For perhaps relevant software versions, I am using perl v5.16, Test::More v0.98, and Module::Starter v1.58.

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4  
a fine question, well formed and containing appropriate details. welcome to SO –  Joel Berger Oct 19 '12 at 2:00
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3 Answers

You've quite correctly explained the reason for the first error, and fixed it right (with specifying the correct package name). But you seem to miss the simple fact: speak method of Animal class does not return this a $class goes... string - it returns the result of printing it (which is 1) instead!

See, this subroutine:

sub speak {
    my $class = shift;
    print "a $class goes ", $class->sound, "!\n";
}

... does not have an explicit return statement. In this case returned is the result of evaluating the latest invoked statement of the subroutine - i.e., result of evaluating print something, which is 1 (true, actually).

That's why the test fails. You can fix it either with testing for 1 (but that's too trivial, I suppose) or changing the method itself so it will return a string that it prints. For example:

sub speak {
    my $class = shift;
    my $statement = "a $class goes " . $class->sound . "!\n";
    print $statement;
    return $statement;
}

... and, frankly speaking, both approaches look a bit... fishy. The latter one, while obviously more complete, will not actually cover all the functionality of this speak method: it tests whether the statement was correct or not only, but not whether it was printed or not. )

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Interesting, thanks! I should be returning the string instead of printing it. I have to double check, but I think this will qualify as errata for this book. –  rsa Oct 19 '12 at 0:27
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You've already worked out that the problem with your call to is was that you were in the wrong package at the time you made the call. Fully specifying the function name as you have done works, as does importing is into your namespace by saying

use Test::More;

somewhere in the package with the test.

The answer to the rest of your question lies in the difference between what you are testing and what you are doing. What speak does is print, but when you ask is(speak, ...), you are asking about what speak returns, which is unrelated to what it printed. It is in fact the not-very-useful return value of print.

Since the purpose of speak is to print a particular string, a test for speak should test that it did in fact print a string and that it was the right string. For the test to do that, though, you need some way to capture what was printed.

There are in fact a couple of ways to do that, from using IO::File to force you to specify a file handle to which to print to monkey patching a replacement for print into you class, but the following technique doesn't require any modification to the system under test to improve its testability.

The select built-in allows you to change where print prints. The default output channel is STDOUT, though you should generally pretend you don't know that kind of thing. Fortunately, you can also use select to discover the original file handle, though you should probably make sure you restore the default file handle (which is, after all, a global variable) even if your test dies for some reason. So you need to manage exceptions. And you need a file handle you can check the contents of and not necessarily actually print anything; IO::Scalar can help there.

With this approach, you wind up being able to test the original code with

package AnimalTest;
use IO::Scalar;

use Test::More tests => 1;
use Try::Tiny;

{
    package Foofle;
    use base qw(Animal);

    sub sound { 'foof' }
}

{
    my $original_FH = select;
    try {
        my $result;
        select IO::Scalar->new(\$result);

        Foofle->speak();
        is(
            $result, "A Foofle goes foof!\n",
            "An Animal subclass does the right thing"
        );
    } catch {
        die $_;
    } finally {
        select $original_FH;
    };
}

Try::Tiny is making sure you don't litter if speak happens to give the Animal an aneurysm, print is redirected to modify a scalar rather than actually print to the screen, and now the test fails for the right reason, to wit: the strings have mismatched capitalization.

You'll notice that there is a lot of set up involved; this is because the system under test is not particularly well set up for testability and so we have to compensate. In my own code, this is not the approach I would choose, I would instead opt to make the original code more testable. Then for the testing, I monkey-patch (i.e., override one of the methods under test), often using TMOE. This approach looks more like this:

[in Animal:]

sub speak {
    my $class = shift;
    $class->print("a $class goes ", $class->sound, "!\n");
}

sub print {
    my $class = shift;
    print @_;
}

[later:]

{
    package Foofle;
    use base qw(Animal);

    sub sound { 'foof' }

    sub print {
        my ($self, @text) = @_;

        return join '', @text;
    }

}

is(
    Foofle->speak(), "A Foofle goes foof!\n",
    "An Animal subclass does the right thing"
);

You'll notice that this looks a lot more like your original code. The main difference is that instead of calling built-in print directly, Animal calls $class->print, which in turns calls built-in print. The subclass Foofle then overrides that print method to return its arguments rather than printing them, which gives the testing code access to what would have been printed.

This approach is much cleaner than having to modify globals in order to figure out what is getting printed, but it does have two disadvantages: It requires modifying the code under test to make it more testable, and it never actually tests whether printing happens. It just tests that print was called with the right arguments. It is therefore imperative that Animal::print be so trivial as to be obviously correct by inspection.

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This answer wound up being longer than I had intended, since I found that I wanted to present both alternatives. –  darch Oct 19 '12 at 4:14
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I'm imagining your code looks something like:

package SomeTest;   # if omitted, it's like saying "package main"
use Test::More;
...
{
    package Foofle;
    is( something, something_else );
}

The use Test::More statement will export some of the Test::More's functions to the calling namespace, in this case SomeTest (or main). This means that functions will be defined for the symbols main::is, main::ok, main::done_testing, etc.

In the block that begins with package Foofle, you are now in the Foofle namespace, so now Perl will look for a function that corresponds to the symbol Foofle::is. It won't find one, so it will complain and exit.

One workaround is to import Test::More into Foofle's namespace, too.

{
    package Foofle;
    use Test::More;
    is( something, something_else );
}

and another one is to use a fully qualified method name to call is:

{
    package Foofle;
    Test::More::is( something, something_else );
}
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