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Would like to know if there is a function in python that can take partial information in a time tuple and return a time tuple with complete information. For example, as I am typing, the date is Thursday, Oct 18, 2012. This means the day of the year is 292 and the weekday number is 3. I would like to be able to do something like:

>>> part_tuple=2012,10,18,0,0,0,0,0,0   
>>> complete_time_tuple=unknown_mod.unknown_func(part_tuple)
>>> complete_time_tuple
>>> (2012, 10, 18, 0, 0, 0, 292, 3, 0)

Alternatively, I would like to do:

>>> part_tuple=2012,0,0,0,0,0,292,0,0
>>> complete_time_tuple=unknown_mod.unknown_func(part_tuple)

and get complete_tuple back again. Code can certainly be written to do this, but I am guessing that it's already buried in a python module -- time, datetime, calendar, or something -- somewhere. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your first question, you can use datetime (which requires at least Y, M, D):

from datetime import datetime

dt = datetime(2012, 10, 18)
print dt.timetuple()
# time.struct_time(tm_year=2012, tm_mon=10, tm_mday=18, tm_hour=0, tm_min=0, tm_sec=0, tm_wday=3, tm_yday=292, tm_isdst=-1)

And the second should be easy enough with:

from datetime import timedelta
print datetime(2012, 1, 1) + timedelta(days=291)
# datetime.datetime(2012, 10, 18, 0, 0)
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Thanks! And thanks for the timedelta sol'n. I guess it's obvious I'm new at this. –  bob.sacamento Oct 19 '12 at 22:23

datetime.timetuple seems to be precisely what you ask for:

>>> import datetime
>>> d = datetime.date(2012, 10, 18)
>>> d.timetuple()
time.struct_time(tm_year=2012, tm_mon=10, tm_mday=18, tm_hour=0, tm_min=0, tm_sec=0, tm_wday=3, tm_yday=292, tm_isdst=-1)
>>> tuple(d.timetuple())
(2012, 10, 18, 0, 0, 0, 3, 292, -1)
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Thanks much! Guess you can tell I'm new to python. –  bob.sacamento Oct 19 '12 at 22:22

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