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PLEASE NOTE: These are code snippets depicting the general dilemma. The complete code DOES include "include guards" / #pragma once / whathaveyou.

I'm implementing the visitor pattern for traversing an AST and wondering what's the C++ way to solve the following:

I have AST.h which has the base AST node class declaration:

    class Node
    {
    public:
        virtual void accept(Visitor* v) {v->visit(this);}
    };

Along with all concrete node subclasses for declarations, expressions,etc..

And then I have ASTVisitor.h which declares the visitor interface, along the lines of:

    class Visitor
    {
    public:
        Visitor() {}
        virtual ~Visitor() {}

        virtual void visit(StringElement* e) {}
        virtual void visit(RealElement* e) {}
        virtual void visit(IntegerElement* e) {}
        ...

The problem is, AST.h needs ASTVisitor.h so that the accept method knows that Visitor objects have a visit method. That is, so that both Visitor and visit() are declared for virtual void accept(Visitor* v) {v->visit(this);}. But at the same time, ASTVisitor.h needs AST.h so that the Visitor class knows that all concrete subclasses of Node exist. That is, so that, for instance, StringElement is declared for the signature in virtual void visit(StringElement* e)

But including ASTVisitor.h in AST.h and AST.h in ASTVisitor.h results in the Visitor class not being "seen" by the Node class and therefore, not being valid as a type for accept's parameter. Also, doing a forward declaration, like class Visitor; in AST.h only solves the type problem for the method signature, but inside the method v->visit(this) is still invalid since the forward declaration says nothing about the methods for the Visitor class.

So what's the C++ way of solving this?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a way to do this in C++. You need to use forward declarations and, if required, split declarations and definitions. Here is an example (please read comments for explanation):

#include <cstdio>
#include <string>

/// --- A.hpp ---

// First, you have to forward declare a visitor type.
class Visitor;

// Then declare/define a node base class (interface).
class Node {
  public:
    Node() {}
    virtual ~Node() {}

    // Note that Visitor, as a type, is referenced here, but none of its
    // "body" is used, so forward declaration is enough for us.
    virtual void accept(Visitor & v) = 0;
};

/// --- B.hpp (includes A.hpp) ---

// Then, to declare the actual interface for a visitor, we must play the same
// trick with forward declaration, but for specific node types:
class NodeA;
class NodeB;

// And once those types are "pre-declared", declare visitor interface.
class Visitor {
  public:
    Visitor() {}
    virtual ~Visitor() {}

    virtual void visit(const Node & node);
    virtual void visit(const NodeA & node);
    virtual void visit(const NodeB & node);
};

/// --- C.hpp (includes B.hpp) ---

// Once visitor is declared, declare/define specific nodes.
class NodeA : public Node {
  public:
    std::string node_name;

    NodeA() : node_name("I am a node of type A!") {}
    virtual ~NodeA() {}
    virtual void accept(Visitor & v) { v.visit(*this); }
};

class NodeB : public Node {
  public:
    std::string node_name;

    NodeB() : node_name("B node here!") {}
    virtual ~NodeB() {}
    virtual void accept(Visitor & v) { v.visit(*this); }
};

// --- B.cpp (includes B.hpp and C.hpp) ---

// Now, nodes are declared, so that we can define visitor's methods.
// Note that if you don't need to use "node" parameters, this can
// as well go with declaration and there is no need to "define" this later.
void Visitor::visit(const Node & node) {
    printf("Base visitor got base node\n");
}

void Visitor::visit(const NodeA & node) {
    printf("Base visitor got node A\n");
}

void Visitor::visit(const NodeB & node) {
    printf("Base visitor got node B\n");
}

// --- YourProgram.[cpp|hpp] includes at most C.hpp --

// Than, at any point in your program, you can have a specific visitor:
class MyVisitor : public Visitor {
  public:
    MyVisitor() {}
    virtual ~MyVisitor() {}

    virtual void visit(const Node & node) {
        printf("Got base node...\n");
    }

    virtual void visit(const NodeA & node) {
        printf("Got %s\n", node.node_name.c_str());
    }

    virtual void visit(const NodeB & node) {
        printf("Got %s\n", node.node_name.c_str());
    }
};

// And everything can be used like this, for example:
int main()
{
    Visitor generic_visitor;
    MyVisitor my_visitor;

    NodeA().accept(generic_visitor);
    NodeA().accept(my_visitor);
    NodeB().accept(generic_visitor);
    NodeB().accept(my_visitor);
}

... and by the way, don't forget to use include guards or else you may end up including the same file multiple times which will result in a lot of errors.

share|improve this answer
    
There are include guards. I just didn't copy them for the sake of brevity in the question. – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:09
    
@SaldaVonSchwartz: Good. I was just not sure about how much you know about C++, so just in case added that. You know... – user405725 Oct 19 '12 at 1:11
    
Still your solution is not working for me either. If I forward declare all the concrete node types in the visitor header, then since I need to include both the visitor header and the AST header in AST.cpp to implement the accept method, I get that Visitor and node are ambiguous since they are declared in the h files but there's also forward declarations to them (to visitor in AST.h and to the nodes in ASTVisitor.h) – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:18
3  
Aha. The C++ way to do this is to not define, just declare your accept method. You are defining it in your header file, so the methods need to be known while processing the header file. You'll see @Vlad only declared accept- and even put a helpful comment in about this. Create a .cpp file with the definition of accept, and only then will you need to know that v has a visit function. Include both headers in your .cpp file and you should be fine. – Matt Oct 19 '12 at 1:28
1  
Vlad, your solution was right! Xcode just started being... Xcode at that point. I created a new project and imported the same AST.h, AST.cpp and ASTVisitor.h and it compiled just fine. The forward declaration ambiguity and the out-of-line disappeared. I re-imported the files to my original project and now they compile just fine – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 2:30

To be clear, this is not a question about the visitor pattern. It is more about the recursive include problem...

First, you should make sure you are employing separate compilation on your project. That is, placing interfaces in .h files and implementation in .cpp files. It is not extremely clear from your question whether this is the case or not, but your implementation of Node::accept() shouldn't be in a header IMO.

Forward Declarations

When separate compilation is employed you can take advantage of forward declaration. Types referenced in header files that do not require the compiler to know about those types' interfaces can simply be declared at the top of the header. So for example, in AST.h you would not need to include ASTVisitor.h, just do the following (again assuming you have moved implementation of accept() into a cpp (AST.cpp) file.

class Visitor;
class Node
{
public:
    virtual void accept(Visitor* v);
};

Note that this works because the compiler needs to know nothing about the Visitor class. It is only referenced as a pointer (Visitor*) so the compiler doesn't need to know interface or implementation (memory footprint).

The preprocessor.

If you are intent on leaving the implementation of accept() in the header file, you can use a preprocessor approach. I always recommend this as a good practice anyway. Wrap all of your header files in #ifndef blocks. For example, in AST.h ( I stil have forward declares in there):

#ifndef ast_h
#define ast_h

class Visitor;

class Node
{
    ...
}

#endif //ast_h

And then also in ASTVisitor.h

#ifndef astvisitor_h
#define astvisitor_h

class StringElement;
class RealElement;
class IntegerElement;

class Visitor
{
    ...
}

#endif //astvisitor_h

This will prevent the compiler from trying to include and therefore redefine the class multiple times in a single compilation unit.

From the looks of your code above, you can probably just use separate compilation and forward declaration to your advantage if you don't want to use the preprocessor. Let me know how it goes.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you might have not read the whole thing. First, I have include guards. I already answered that. Second, I know about forward declaration. That is not the problem. My original question even explains I tried forward declaration. Third, my comments to the previous two attempts at a solution clearly state that I also tried moving the implementation to the cpp files, at which point I get out-of-line errors – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:28

Create, compile and link a file AST.cpp that contains the implementation of accept():

void Node::accept(Visitor* v) {v->visit(this);}

Now, ASTVisitor.h includes AST.h, and AST.h declares class Visitor;. The CPP file includes both header files.

Why is accept declared as virtual?

For a "true" interface, replace {} by = 0; in the declaration of Visitor's methods.

EDIT: Thinking about your implementation, and with the help of Vlad's answer, I now see what's wrong. Use the "curiously recurring template" pattern to avoid repeating the implementation of accept:

class Node {
    void accept(Visitor* v) = 0;
}

template <class ME>
class NodeAcceptor : public Node {
    void accept(Visitor* v);
}

template <class ME>
void NodeAcceptor<ME>::accept(Visitor* v) { v->accept(static_cast<ME*>(this)); }

Derive each NodeSubclass from NodeAcceptor<NodeSubclass>.

This makes sure that the correct accept() method is called.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, the virtual in the Node class is part of a previous implementation that I haven't cleaned up yet, same as the Visitor not being abstract.. just cause i was testing a few of the methods in a visitor at the same time, and wanted to be able to instantiate the class. But both things will eventually be cleaned up for the final code – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 0:53
    
I just tried your approach in an AST.cpp that includes AST.h and ASTVisitor.h but I get two errors: out of line definition for the accept signature and and no matching member function for v->visit(this). The latter I assume means I'll also need a dummy visit(Node*) method in the Visitor even if at runtime is never used, right? Since the compiler is obviously checking the type against the pointer which is generic Node when implementing the method. But what's the deal with the former error? – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:01
    
The out of line error is with the declaration of accept in the header as 'void accept(Visitor* v);', and nothing but a forward declaration of Visitor before the class declaration – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:07
    
but there's no "correct accept" for each class. They should all inherit the base implementation. accept is merely for the visitor to do different things to the node subclasses based on their type. – SaldaVonSchwartz Oct 19 '12 at 1:21
    
But this isn't going to work with the code you provided. Other languages might choose the "right" visit method based on the "true" type of the object this refers to, but C++ does not -- it will stupidly call visit(Node*) for all subtypes. That's the reason for your "no matching member" error, that's why Vlad has reimplemented accept for every subclass, and that's why I'm suggesting the CRTP. – krlmlr Oct 19 '12 at 1:29

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