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As everybody knows using virtual keyword for a method in a class allows us to override it in its derived sub-class. However, method still has to stick to the same signature e.g. return value, argument and etc.

Question: in C#, how can I can override the signature as well? is this possible?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is not possible. You can create an overload, though, if you need it.

Edit

To make my case against new, please consider the case where you have a base object, and one that inherits from it. By placing new before the method of which you're attempting to "change" the method signature, you're actually wasting four key strokes.

public class Base {
    public string Foo () { return null; }
}

public class Inherited : Base {
    public new int Foo () { return 0; }
}

Now, Inherited has two methods:

public string Foo () { return null; }
public int Foo () { return 0; }

You are not actually changing the method signature. Thus, the new keyword isn't even needed. You will get the same effect without it:

public class Inherited : Base {
    public int Foo () { return 0; }
}

The use of new is to override a non-virtual member of a base class:

public class Base { 
    public string Foo () { return null; }
}

public class Inherited : Base {
    public new string Foo () { return "Something else..."; }
}

But you will run into issues with this if you don't pay attention to this subtlety. With virtual you get a virtual look-up table that will map your functions to the correct call. With new, you will not. If you pass in Inherited where a Base object is required (this will work, of course), the Base class's Foo() will be called! Not, the Inherited "override" of Foo().

This is not the same behavior as overriding a virtual member.

public static class MyClass {
    public string MyMethod (Base @base) {
        return @base.Foo ();
    }
}

[Test]
public void then_it_should_return_non_null () {
    var obj = new Inherited ();
    var result = MyClass.MyMethod(obj);  // obj will get upcasted to Base
    Assert.That (result, Is.EqualTo(obj.Foo ())); // Assert fails!
}

[Test]
public void inherited_should_return_correct_value ()
{
    var obj = new Inherited ();
    var result = obj.Foo ();  // will access the "new" method, hiding Base's implementation
    Assert.That (result, Is.Not.Null);  // Assert passes! 
}
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You can hide the old implementation with the new keyword. However, the base class won't be able to see it.

class Base {
   public string Foo() { }
}

class Sub : Base {
   new public int Foo() { }
}

new is only needed if the calling signature is the same.

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That doesn't change the signature, though. –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 19 '12 at 1:04
    
@JamesD'Angelo yes it can change the signature. –  Daniel A. White Oct 19 '12 at 1:05
    
@JamesD'Angelo msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/435f1dw2.aspx –  Daniel A. White Oct 19 '12 at 1:06
    
It does not change the signature. It overrides a non-virtual class member. –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 19 '12 at 1:09
    
A quick sanity check in VS gives me a warning: "The member 'foo.bar()' does not hide an inherited member. The new keyword is not required." –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 19 '12 at 1:10

You talking about create a new method. If the name is the same, but the parameters are different (return type and parameter's type and number of parameters) you actual do overloading.

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At that point you are just making a new method. But, if you want to simply create a new method with a new method signature, and then call the base.OtherMethod(param1, param2)... you can.

The point I'm trying to make is that, if you intend to create a method with the same name as in the base class, but with a different signature but you still want to just call the base class, then you can.

For example:

// In base class - note, the "virtual" isn't necessary.
public virtual void PostMessage(string message, DateTime entryDate) { ... }

Then you think... "Oh man, I wish this base class had an overload for that method that didn't require the date... what can I do?!"

// In your sub-class.
public void PostMessage(string message)
{
    base.PostMessage(message, DateTime.Now);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comment. I see what you saying but didn't get the last statement "and then call the base.OtherMethod(param1, param2)... you can." can you give me some ideas on that? –  amit kohan Oct 19 '12 at 1:11
    
I'll edit the answer to be more clear. –  Timothy Khouri Oct 20 '12 at 0:35

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