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I would like to sort the keys of Hash2 by the order of the values of Hash1. Hash2 does not need to contain all the values of Hash1. Hash1 does not need to contain all the keys of Hash2. If a key exists in Hash2 that does not have a corresponding value in Hash1, it should be ordered below any existing ordered keys.

Hash1 = {
    p0: "q11",
    p1: "q55",
    p2: "q92",
    p3: "q77"

}

Hash2 = {
    q55: {...},
    q23: {...},
    q59: {...},
    q98: {...},
    q11: {...}
}

=>
DesiredHash = {
    q11: {...},
    q55: {...},
    q23: {...},
    q59: {...},       
    q98: {...} 
}

What is the most Ruby-ish way of achieving this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
array = Hash1.map{|k, v| [k, v.to_sym]}
Hash[Hash2.sort_by{|k, _| array.index{|_, v| k == v} || array.length}]

Or, perhaps less efficient but shorter:

array = Hash1.to_a
Hash[Hash2.sort_by{|k, _| array.index{|_, v| k == v.to_s} || array.length}]

Explanation (Using the second one) Hash1 will be used as a reference, which means you want to do something with its "index". Since hashes do not have the notion of index, you have to convert it into an array. to_a does that. Next, you want to sort Hash2 (which means it will be implicitly converted to an array with key-value pairs) in the order the index of array such that the key of Hash2 matches the "value" of array. index{...} will look up such index. In case there is no match, array.length will be assigned, which is bigger than any index of array. Finally, you want to turn that pairs of key-value back into a hash. That is done by Hash[...].

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Could you explain what is going on here? It works fantastically, but I would like to understand if I am able. –  OhNoez Woez Oct 19 '12 at 3:25
    
I added the explanation. –  sawa Oct 19 '12 at 3:31

Similar to @sawa's but the use of Hash#values really cleans things up imho:

keys = Hash1.values.map &:to_sym
Hash[Hash2.sort_by{|k, v| keys.index(k) || keys.length}]
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hash1 = {
    p0: "q11",
    p1: "q55",
    p2: "q92",
    p3: "q77"

}

hash2 = {
    q55: 1,
    q23: 2,
    q59: 3,
    q98: 4,
    q11: 5
}

def get_key(hash, value)
  hash.each { |k, v| return k if v == value }
  return hash.keys.max
end

Hash[hash2.sort_by { |a, _| get_key(hash1, a.to_s) }]
#=> {:q11=>5, :q55=>1, :q23=>2, :q98=>4, :q59=>3}
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is there a quick and easy way to turn that final array of arrays into a Hash? –  OhNoez Woez Oct 19 '12 at 3:18
    
ah Hash[], I see –  OhNoez Woez Oct 19 '12 at 3:25
    
@OhNoezWoez sorry yes, I edited the answer. –  oldergod Oct 19 '12 at 4:12

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