Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering that how to use a loop (may be a for loop) to sort data like following.

      [,1]
 [1,]  179
 [2,]  160
 [3,]  136
 [4,]  227
 [5,]  217
 [6,]  168
 [7,]  108
 [8,]  124
 [9,]  143
[10,]  140

I tried to use a loop like this:

for (i in 1:nrow(v)) {
for (j in i+1:nrow(v)) {
if (v[i] > v[j]) {
v[i] <- v[j]
}
else {
v[i] <- v[i]
}
}
}
v

But finally a error message turned out :/

Error in if (chickwts[i, 1] > chickwts[j, 1]) { : 
  missing value where TRUE/FALSE needed

I know that this is very simple by using order to do it, but as a beginner of R, I am curious how to do this by loop. Hope someone can help. Thank you!

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by casperOne Oct 19 '12 at 12:15

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What have you tried? sort is a start. There is also order. –  Maiasaura Oct 19 '12 at 3:36
    
Check out sort, rank, order. You can see help file from > help(sort) –  liuminzhao Oct 19 '12 at 3:40
    
actually, i am trying to come out the express after the if statement. for (i in nrow(v)) { for (j in i+1:nrow(v)) { if (v[i, 1] > v[j, 1]) {expression} } } I've also tried by search keywords like, sort, loop, and order, also checked the help file. Sorry about that... –  Jenaro Oct 19 '12 at 3:46
add comment

1 Answer

The short answer is don't, because sort.list implements a number sorting algorithms more efficiently using internal, well optimised code.

You need to decide on the sorting method you wish to use. See this wikipedia artile for a good summary.

Each of the sorting algorithms have psuedocode which can be translated to R

Here is an implementation of a bubbleSort, implementing the pseudocode from here

procedure bubbleSort( A : list of sortable items )
   repeat     
     swapped = false
     for i = 1 to length(A) - 1 inclusive do:
       /* if this pair is out of order */
       if A[i-1] > A[i] then
         /* swap them and remember something changed */
         swap( A[i-1], A[i] )
         swapped = true
       end if
     end for
   until not swapped
end procedure

In R this would look something like

set.seed(1)
A <- sample(10)
A

##  [1]  3  4  5  7  2  8  9  6 10  1


n <- length(A)

repeat {
    swapped = FALSE
    for (i in 2:length(A)) {
        newA <- A
        if (A[i - 1] > A[i]) {
            newA[i - 1] <- A[i]
            newA[i] <- A[i - 1]
            A <- newA
            swapped <- TRUE
        }
    }
    if (!swapped) {break}
}
# ta da!
A

##  [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.