Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a simple program to calculate proximity distance measures of coordinates read from text file, I want to create method to calculate manhattan distance of given points for example:

(0,1,1,0,1), (1,0,0,0,1), (0,0,0,1,1)
would result in:
      Item1 Item2 Item3
Item1  0    3     3
Item2  3    0     2
Item3  3    2     0

Manhattan Method:

public static void Manhattan(ArrayList<Points> x) {
        ArrayList<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        int distance = 0;
        for(int ii=0;ii<x.size();ii++) {
            for(int jj=0; jj<x.get(ii).coordinates.size();jj++) {
                 distance = Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj)) + Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj));
            }   
            result.add(distance);
        }
        for(int ii=0;ii<result.size();ii++) {
            for(int jj=0; jj<result.size();jj++) {
                System.out.print(result.get(ii));
            }
            System.out.print(" ");
        }

    }

Class Point:

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class Points {
    ArrayList<Integer> coordinates = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    public Points (ArrayList<Integer> coordinates) {
        this.coordinates = coordinates;
    }
    public ArrayList<Integer> getCoordinates() {
        return coordinates;
    }
    public void setCoordinates(ArrayList<Integer> coordinates) {
        this.coordinates = coordinates;
    }
}

the problem is that I get weird results when I run the method, anyone knows what's the problem?

result: 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 222222222222222 
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A Integer can not represent a coordinate. You can create something like -

public class Coordinate {
    private int x;
    private int y;

    //...getter/setter/constructor ...
}

which can represent a coordinate.

And instead of (list of just integers)

ArrayList<Integer> coordinates = new ArrayList<Integer>();

use (list of coordinates)

List<Coordinate> coordinates = new ArrayList<Coordinate>();

Now, if you define a method as @Hovercraft suggested (for Coordinate) it will be really easy to calculate distance between all the points to all other points (including itself)

for(int i=0; i<coordinates.size(); i++) {
    for(int i=0; i<coordinates.size(); i++) {
        System.out.println(manhattnDist(coordinates.get(i), coordinates.get(j)));
    }
}

One obvious problem in your code

    int distance = 0;
    for(int ii=0;ii<x.size();ii++) {
        for(int jj=0; jj<x.get(ii).coordinates.size();jj++) {
             //you keep assigning new values 
             distance = Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj)) + Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj));
        }   
        //and then you add
        result.add(distance);
    }
share|improve this answer

You're calculating the distance between 2 points but not saving that result anywhere:

for(int jj=0; jj<x.get(ii).coordinates.size();jj++) {
    distance = Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj)) +
               Math.abs(x.get(ii).coordinates.get(jj));
    //what happens with distance?
}
//you get only the last distance between the last points.
result.add(distance);

One more thing, your distance variable is an integer that will try to hold double values, is that right?

share|improve this answer
    
@GregHewgill oh ok, I'll delete that from my answer. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 19 '12 at 3:53

You need to refactor things to simplify I think. First and foremost, create a simple manhattanDist method that accepts two Point objects and that returns an int:

public int manhattanDist(Point p1, Point p2) {
  // calc the manhattan distance and return it
}

Then you can easily use this method when comparing your ArrayList<Point> without mixing up things in your for loops as you're doing above.

Also, please learn and use Java naming conventions including:

  • method names should begin with a lower case letter
  • class names should begin with an upper case letter.
  • identifier names should be logical, should make sense, and should make your code self-commenting.

This is only important if you want others (such as your instructors, or us) to more easily and quickly understand your code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.