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What multithreading methods do different OS use and why are they important:

Multithreading Models

    Many-to-One - many user threads to one kernel thread
    One-to-One - each user thread is mapped to a kernel thread
    Many-to-Many - Many user threads to smaller or equal # of kernel threads

This is what I know about multithreading models.

  • Solaris uses Many-to-One
  • Linux & Windows family (at least to XP, not sure about Win7) uses One-to-One
  • IRIX, HP-UX,andTru64 UNIX (Solaris prior to v9) uses Many-to-Many

Why they are important?

  1. Responsiveness - web browsing in one thread, loading images in another
  2. Resource sharing - allow several thread of activity in same address space
  3. Economy - memory & resources for process creation is costly while threads share resources of a process (Solaris is 30x slower creating process than a thread)
  4. Scalability - In multiprocessor, threads can run parallel on diff processors, single-thread process can only run on one processor regardless of how many processors exist
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The question is not, what operation system uses which model. If an user application uses threads (or something similar) these threads can be mapped in different ways to kernel processes. If, in turn, the operating system provides threads (and the most do, amongst others the os you named), than a user-visible thread may be identical with a kernel thread. However, I can always use a library/run-time system(vm)/compiler that choses a different mapping.

Differences appear for certain situations. E.g., assume all user-visible threads are simulated by a run-time system that runs as a single process/thread. In this case, a system call like lock may block this very kernel process and thus, all user threads of this application. To avoid such situations, the run-time usually intercepts cerain call and cares itself about.

That is the general situation. In detail, it may be a little more complicated. E.g., if you code a WIndows program that uses the GUI you have to be aware of the programming model, especially stuff related to the event loop. In addition, beside of processes and threads Windows also provides jobs and fibers as units of execution (or more precisly: entities that are considered for scheduling and resource management).

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+1 Yes - that is the big problem with 'user space threads' - any API call that might block has to be 'simulated' by a state-machine in the user-thread manager in order to prevent the call blocking the kernel thread running the fibers. This is often very difficult/impossible, (eg. if an API has no non-blocking version). This issue also applies to any libraries the user-space thread might call. This is all so messy, constraining and inflexible that I don't know of anyone who uses 'user-space threads'. I certainly would not. – Martin James Oct 19 '12 at 10:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Answered own question, edited original content:

This is what I know about multithreading models.

Solaris uses Many-to-One Linux & Windows family (at least to XP, not sure about Win7) uses One-to-One IRIX, HP-UX,andTru64 UNIX (Solaris prior to v9) uses Many-to-Many Why they are important?

Responsiveness - web browsing in one thread, loading images in another Resource sharing - allow several thread of activity in same address space Economy - memory & resources for process creation is costly while threads share resources of a process (Solaris is 30x slower creating process than a thread) Scalability - In multiprocessor, threads can run parallel on diff processors, single-thread process can only run on one processor regardless of how many processors exist

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