Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a switch as a state manager for my XNA game. The switch is a part of main update method, so it's run every frame. Sometimes I need to set a timer value and it should only be set once per method call. There are multiple methods that set the timer per case, so it can't use the current and previous state numbers to check if it's ok to overwrite previous time.

case "state 34": {
SetTime(theTime); // should run only once
// other things
if (TheTimeisRight(time)) // runs every call
    {
        SetTime(theTime); // should run only once
        if (TheTimeisRight(time)) 
        { /*  some methods  */ }
    }
break; }

How can I make this work, or is there a better way to do this without going outside the switch? (changing SetTime method is ok, but I wouldn't like to clutter up the switch with additional code)

share|improve this question
2  
Can you add your complete Switch Code, and explain more about it –  andy Oct 19 '12 at 5:19
    
@Anandkumar what is unclear about the switch? I've given an example of my switch in the question, every case is roughly like what you see there, only checks, methods and parameters are different. –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:21
    
Is it per method call, per frame? IE once per frame? –  Alan Oct 19 '12 at 5:25
    
@Alan switch is called every frame and SetTime should only be called once per call in code, so if there are two SetTime methods in a row, they should be called each once. –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:27
    
Okay I think I understand. are you opposed to modifying the signature of the switch statement? –  Alan Oct 19 '12 at 5:31

4 Answers 4

If you don't want to mess with boolean variables ala hasSetTimeAlready, you can always introduce another state that calls the method, then proceeds to the original state.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather not use another state, one is enough already with an Earth radius long switch. –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:23
    
If your switch is too long already, you should use classes for your states. Leads to an explosion of small classes, but keeps the code readable. –  lbruder Oct 19 '12 at 5:29
    
Can you provide some links to information on that? –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:31
    
In the simplest case, just define an interface State with, say, a Name property, and an Execute method that does whatever it wants and returns the next state to switch to. For more complicated problems, dotnet.zcu.cz/NET_2006/Papers_2006/short/B31-full.pdf has some nice ideas. –  lbruder Oct 19 '12 at 5:35
    
Additionally, have a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_pattern –  lbruder Oct 19 '12 at 5:41

Another method: Introduce a wrapper around the method you want to call:

    public sealed class RunOnceAction
    {
        private readonly Action F;
        private bool hasRun;

        public RunOnceAction(Action f)
        {
            F = f;
        }

        public void run()
        {
            if (hasRun) return;
            F();
            hasRun = true;
        }
    }

Then create var setTimeOnce = new RunOnceAction(() => SetTime(theTime)); before the switch statement, and call there as setTimeOnce.run(). Adjust for parameters/return values as necessary.

share|improve this answer

Put the call outside the loop.
You might need a separate conditional statement to determine whether it should run at all, but that's got to be infinitely better than trying to use flags and/or various other smelly-code approaches to control repetitions of the call.

Edit:

here is what I mean by putting it in one place outside of the switch:

if (someCondition && someOtherCondition && yetAnotherCondition)  
    setTime(theTime); // just one call, in one place, gets executed once

switch(someValue) 
{
    case "state 34": {
        //SetTime(theTime); // no longer necessary
        // other things
        if (TheTimeisRight(time)) // runs every call
        {
            //SetTime(theTime); // no longer necessary
            if (TheTimeisRight(time)) 
            { /*  some methods  */ }
        }
        break;

    ...etc...
}

A word of advice: use an enumeration for your switch value rather than a string.

To be brutally honest, this is about as much as anyone can realistically help you with this without seeing a more complete code sample (I think the sample you gave us is somewhat contrived and not quite accurate to what you have?). Chances are that the best way to get round this problem is to deconstruct the switch statement and start again because either maintaining a state machine is not the best way to handle this situation or you need to introduce some other states.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to keep everything in one place, but I guess it's not an easy way. –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:22
    
@user1306322 But it's not really "all in the same place" because you have multiple places where it is called from. Putting it outside the switch will definitely be keeping it in the one place. –  slugster Oct 19 '12 at 5:25
    
I don't understand how putting outside and keeping in one place are… Well, it doesn't make sense to me :) –  user1306322 Oct 19 '12 at 5:29
    
@user1306322 You end up with one call to the function if the right criteria are met, you don't have several potential calls littered through the code. Putting it outside the switch is probably the easiest fix - to leave it in place would probably require a rework of your switch statement unless you were willing to use smelly code that is prone to errors. –  slugster Oct 19 '12 at 5:34
    
@user1306322 If you employ short-cutting on your conditional statement the execution of a separate conditional won't slow the code by much at all. –  slugster Oct 19 '12 at 5:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have resorted to using HashSet<int> to check if the current SetTime(time, num) method has not been called before with if (!hashSet.Contains(num)).

void SetTime(int time, int num)
{
    if (!hashSet.Contains(num))
        {
            theTime = time;
            hashSet.Add(num);
        }
}

Sure doesn't look too cool, but works and it doesn't damage method call too much (visually), so the switch's readability is saved.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.