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This is a homework assignment I am having trouble with. I need to make an integer to Roman Numeral converter using a method. Later, I must then use the program to write out 1 to 3999 in Roman numerals, so hardcoding is out. My code below is very bare bones, it is a basic i/o loop with a way to exit while using a package for getIntegerFromUser we made in class. I tried searching this website for a match to my needs but the closest I came to it was in C, which isn't my boat. I'm sorry if I missed it.

Is there a way to assign values to Strings and then add them together when I call the method? I've been racking my brain for awhile. Again, this is for homework, I'm really looking for ideas and examples. Thank you very much.

edit: I got some pseudo code from my Professor to help me, and while I understand what he is trying to say, I am having some trouble with the if's. Will I be needing many-many if statements so that my converter will correctly handle the Roman numeral formatting or is there a manner in which I can do this with more efficiency. I've updated my code to reflect my placeholder method.

edit Oct 28 2012 - Hey guys, I got it working. Here's the method I ended up using if anyone is interested.

public static String IntegerToRomanNumeral(int input) {
    if (input < 1 || input > 3999)
        return "Invalid Roman Number Value";
    String s = "";
    while (input >= 1000) {
        s += "M";
        input -= 1000;        }
    while (input >= 900) {
        s += "CM";
        input -= 900;
    }
    while (input >= 500) {
        s += "D";
        input -= 500;
    }
    while (input >= 400) {
        s += "CD";
        input -= 400;
    }
    while (input >= 100) {
        s += "C";
        input -= 100;
    }
    while (input >= 90) {
        s += "XC";
        input -= 90;
    }
    while (input >= 50) {
        s += "L";
        input -= 50;
    }
    while (input >= 40) {
        s += "XL";
        input -= 40;
    }
    while (input >= 10) {
        s += "X";
        input -= 10;
    }
    while (input >= 9) {
        s += "IX";
        input -= 9;
    }
    while (input >= 5) {
        s += "V";
        input -= 5;
    }
    while (input >= 4) {
        s += "IV";
        input -= 4;
    }
    while (input >= 1) {
        s += "I";
        input -= 1;
    }    
    return s;
}
share|improve this question
1  
"assign values to Strings and then add them together" Look to StringBuilder. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 19 '12 at 5:30
    
String s1 = "Hello"; String s2 = "world"; System.out.println(s1 + " "+ s2);. Given the fact that this is a homework, you should concatenate the Strings as in the provided code. Otherwise, if you're thinking on performance and best practices, you should use the StringBuilder as stated in Andrew Thompson's comment. –  Luiggi Mendoza Oct 19 '12 at 5:30
4  
"this is for homework I'm really looking for ideas and examples" You will learn better if people withold examples and you figure it out from ideas. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 19 '12 at 5:32

11 Answers 11

From Java Notes 6.0 website:

      /**
       * An object of type RomanNumeral is an integer between 1 and 3999.  It can
       * be constructed either from an integer or from a string that represents
       * a Roman numeral in this range.  The function toString() will return a
       * standardized Roman numeral representation of the number.  The function
       * toInt() will return the number as a value of type int.
       */
      public class RomanNumeral {

         private final int num;   // The number represented by this Roman numeral.

         /* The following arrays are used by the toString() function to construct
            the standard Roman numeral representation of the number.  For each i,
            the number numbers[i] is represented by the corresponding string, letters[i].
         */

         private static int[]    numbers = { 1000,  900,  500,  400,  100,   90,  
                                               50,   40,   10,    9,    5,    4,    1 };

         private static String[] letters = { "M",  "CM",  "D",  "CD", "C",  "XC",
                                             "L",  "XL",  "X",  "IX", "V",  "IV", "I" };

         /**
          * Constructor.  Creates the Roman number with the int value specified
          * by the parameter.  Throws a NumberFormatException if arabic is
          * not in the range 1 to 3999 inclusive.
          */
         public RomanNumeral(int arabic) {
            if (arabic < 1)
               throw new NumberFormatException("Value of RomanNumeral must be positive.");
            if (arabic > 3999)
               throw new NumberFormatException("Value of RomanNumeral must be 3999 or less.");
            num = arabic;
         }


         /*
          * Constructor.  Creates the Roman number with the given representation.
          * For example, RomanNumeral("xvii") is 17.  If the parameter is not a
          * legal Roman numeral, a NumberFormatException is thrown.  Both upper and
          * lower case letters are allowed.
          */
         public RomanNumeral(String roman) {

            if (roman.length() == 0)
               throw new NumberFormatException("An empty string does not define a Roman numeral.");

            roman = roman.toUpperCase();  // Convert to upper case letters.

            int i = 0;       // A position in the string, roman;
            int arabic = 0;  // Arabic numeral equivalent of the part of the string that has
                             //    been converted so far.

            while (i < roman.length()) {

               char letter = roman.charAt(i);        // Letter at current position in string.
               int number = letterToNumber(letter);  // Numerical equivalent of letter.

               i++;  // Move on to next position in the string

               if (i == roman.length()) {
                     // There is no letter in the string following the one we have just processed.
                     // So just add the number corresponding to the single letter to arabic.
                  arabic += number;
               }
               else {
                     // Look at the next letter in the string.  If it has a larger Roman numeral
                     // equivalent than number, then the two letters are counted together as
                     // a Roman numeral with value (nextNumber - number).
                  int nextNumber = letterToNumber(roman.charAt(i));
                  if (nextNumber > number) {
                       // Combine the two letters to get one value, and move on to next position in string.
                     arabic += (nextNumber - number);
                     i++;
                  }
                  else {
                       // Don't combine the letters.  Just add the value of the one letter onto the number.
                     arabic += number;
                  }
               }

            }  // end while

            if (arabic > 3999)
               throw new NumberFormatException("Roman numeral must have value 3999 or less.");

            num = arabic;

         } // end constructor


         /**
          * Find the integer value of letter considered as a Roman numeral.  Throws
          * NumberFormatException if letter is not a legal Roman numeral.  The letter 
          * must be upper case.
          */
         private int letterToNumber(char letter) {
            switch (letter) {
               case 'I':  return 1;
               case 'V':  return 5;
               case 'X':  return 10;
               case 'L':  return 50;
               case 'C':  return 100;
               case 'D':  return 500;
               case 'M':  return 1000;
               default:   throw new NumberFormatException(
                            "Illegal character \"" + letter + "\" in Roman numeral");
            }
         }


         /**
          * Return the standard representation of this Roman numeral.
          */
         public String toString() {
            String roman = "";  // The roman numeral.
            int N = num;        // N represents the part of num that still has
                                //   to be converted to Roman numeral representation.
            for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
               while (N >= numbers[i]) {
                  roman += letters[i];
                  N -= numbers[i];
               }
            }
            return roman;
         }


         /**
          * Return the value of this Roman numeral as an int.
          */
         public int toInt() {
            return num;
         }


      } // end class RomanNumeral

  The main program class:

      /** 
       * This program will convert Roman numerals to ordinary arabic numerals
       * and vice versa.  The user can enter a numerals of either type.  Arabic
       * numerals must be in the range from 1 to 3999 inclusive.  The user ends
       * the program by entering an empty line.
       */
      public class RomanConverter {

         public static void main(String[] args) {

            TextIO.putln("Enter a Roman numeral and I will convert it to an ordinary");
            TextIO.putln("arabic integer.  Enter an integer in the range 1 to 3999");
            TextIO.putln("and I will convert it to a Roman numeral.  Press return when");
            TextIO.putln("you want to quit.");

            while (true) {

               TextIO.putln();
               TextIO.put("? ");

               /* Skip past any blanks at the beginning of the input line.
                  Break out of the loop if there is nothing else on the line. */

               while (TextIO.peek() == ' ' || TextIO.peek() == '\t')
                  TextIO.getAnyChar();
               if ( TextIO.peek() == '\n' )
                  break;

               /* If the first non-blank character is a digit, read an arabic
                  numeral and convert it to a Roman numeral.  Otherwise, read
                  a Roman numeral and convert it to an arabic numeral. */

               if ( Character.isDigit(TextIO.peek()) ) {
                  int arabic = TextIO.getlnInt();
                  try {
                      RomanNumeral N = new RomanNumeral(arabic);
                      TextIO.putln(N.toInt() + " = " + N.toString());
                  }
                  catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                      TextIO.putln("Invalid input.");
                      TextIO.putln(e.getMessage());
                  }
               }
               else {
                  String roman = TextIO.getln();
                  try {
                      RomanNumeral N = new RomanNumeral(roman);
                      TextIO.putln(N.toString() + " = " + N.toInt());
                  }
                  catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                      TextIO.putln("Invalid input.");
                      TextIO.putln(e.getMessage());
                  }
               }

            }  // end while

            TextIO.putln("OK.  Bye for now.");

         }  // end main()

      } // end class RomanConverter
share|improve this answer

This my answer:

Use these libraries:

import java.util.LinkedHashMap;
import java.util.Map;

The code:

  public static String RomanNumerals(int Int) {
    LinkedHashMap<String, Integer> roman_numerals = new LinkedHashMap<String, Integer>();
    roman_numerals.put("M", 1000);
    roman_numerals.put("CM", 900);
    roman_numerals.put("D", 500);
    roman_numerals.put("CD", 400);
    roman_numerals.put("C", 100);
    roman_numerals.put("XC", 90);
    roman_numerals.put("L", 50);
    roman_numerals.put("XL", 40);
    roman_numerals.put("X", 10);
    roman_numerals.put("IX", 9);
    roman_numerals.put("V", 5);
    roman_numerals.put("IV", 4);
    roman_numerals.put("I", 1);
    String res = "";
    for(Map.Entry<String, Integer> entry : roman_numerals.entrySet()){
      int matches = Int/entry.getValue();
      res += repeat(entry.getKey(), matches);
      Int = Int % entry.getValue();
    }
    return res;
  }
  public static String repeat(String s, int n) {
    if(s == null) {
        return null;
    }
    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        sb.append(s);
    }
    return sb.toString();
  }

Testing the code:

  for (int i = 1;i<256;i++) {
    System.out.println("i="+i+" -> "+RomanNumerals(i));
  }

The output:

  i=1 -> I
  i=2 -> II
  i=3 -> III
  i=4 -> IV
  i=5 -> V
  i=6 -> VI
  i=7 -> VII
  i=8 -> VIII
  i=9 -> IX
  i=10 -> X
  i=11 -> XI
  i=12 -> XII
  i=13 -> XIII
  i=14 -> XIV
  i=15 -> XV
  i=16 -> XVI
  i=17 -> XVII
  i=18 -> XVIII
  i=19 -> XIX
  i=20 -> XX
  i=21 -> XXI
  i=22 -> XXII
  i=23 -> XXIII
  i=24 -> XXIV
  i=25 -> XXV
  i=26 -> XXVI
  i=27 -> XXVII
  i=28 -> XXVIII
  i=29 -> XXIX
  i=30 -> XXX
  i=31 -> XXXI
  i=32 -> XXXII
  i=33 -> XXXIII
  i=34 -> XXXIV
  i=35 -> XXXV
  i=36 -> XXXVI
  i=37 -> XXXVII
  i=38 -> XXXVIII
  i=39 -> XXXIX
  i=40 -> XL
  i=41 -> XLI
  i=42 -> XLII
  i=43 -> XLIII
  i=44 -> XLIV
  i=45 -> XLV
  i=46 -> XLVI
  i=47 -> XLVII
  i=48 -> XLVIII
  i=49 -> XLIX
  i=50 -> L
  i=51 -> LI
  i=52 -> LII
  i=53 -> LIII
  i=54 -> LIV
  i=55 -> LV
  i=56 -> LVI
  i=57 -> LVII
  i=58 -> LVIII
  i=59 -> LIX
  i=60 -> LX
  i=61 -> LXI
  i=62 -> LXII
  i=63 -> LXIII
  i=64 -> LXIV
  i=65 -> LXV
  i=66 -> LXVI
  i=67 -> LXVII
  i=68 -> LXVIII
  i=69 -> LXIX
  i=70 -> LXX
  i=71 -> LXXI
  i=72 -> LXXII
  i=73 -> LXXIII
  i=74 -> LXXIV
  i=75 -> LXXV
  i=76 -> LXXVI
  i=77 -> LXXVII
  i=78 -> LXXVIII
  i=79 -> LXXIX
  i=80 -> LXXX
  i=81 -> LXXXI
  i=82 -> LXXXII
  i=83 -> LXXXIII
  i=84 -> LXXXIV
  i=85 -> LXXXV
  i=86 -> LXXXVI
  i=87 -> LXXXVII
  i=88 -> LXXXVIII
  i=89 -> LXXXIX
  i=90 -> XC
  i=91 -> XCI
  i=92 -> XCII
  i=93 -> XCIII
  i=94 -> XCIV
  i=95 -> XCV
  i=96 -> XCVI
  i=97 -> XCVII
  i=98 -> XCVIII
  i=99 -> XCIX
  i=100 -> C
  i=101 -> CI
  i=102 -> CII
  i=103 -> CIII
  i=104 -> CIV
  i=105 -> CV
  i=106 -> CVI
  i=107 -> CVII
  i=108 -> CVIII
  i=109 -> CIX
  i=110 -> CX
  i=111 -> CXI
  i=112 -> CXII
  i=113 -> CXIII
  i=114 -> CXIV
  i=115 -> CXV
  i=116 -> CXVI
  i=117 -> CXVII
  i=118 -> CXVIII
  i=119 -> CXIX
  i=120 -> CXX
  i=121 -> CXXI
  i=122 -> CXXII
  i=123 -> CXXIII
  i=124 -> CXXIV
  i=125 -> CXXV
  i=126 -> CXXVI
  i=127 -> CXXVII
  i=128 -> CXXVIII
  i=129 -> CXXIX
  i=130 -> CXXX
  i=131 -> CXXXI
  i=132 -> CXXXII
  i=133 -> CXXXIII
  i=134 -> CXXXIV
  i=135 -> CXXXV
  i=136 -> CXXXVI
  i=137 -> CXXXVII
  i=138 -> CXXXVIII
  i=139 -> CXXXIX
  i=140 -> CXL
  i=141 -> CXLI
  i=142 -> CXLII
  i=143 -> CXLIII
  i=144 -> CXLIV
  i=145 -> CXLV
  i=146 -> CXLVI
  i=147 -> CXLVII
  i=148 -> CXLVIII
  i=149 -> CXLIX
  i=150 -> CL
  i=151 -> CLI
  i=152 -> CLII
  i=153 -> CLIII
  i=154 -> CLIV
  i=155 -> CLV
  i=156 -> CLVI
  i=157 -> CLVII
  i=158 -> CLVIII
  i=159 -> CLIX
  i=160 -> CLX
  i=161 -> CLXI
  i=162 -> CLXII
  i=163 -> CLXIII
  i=164 -> CLXIV
  i=165 -> CLXV
  i=166 -> CLXVI
  i=167 -> CLXVII
  i=168 -> CLXVIII
  i=169 -> CLXIX
  i=170 -> CLXX
  i=171 -> CLXXI
  i=172 -> CLXXII
  i=173 -> CLXXIII
  i=174 -> CLXXIV
  i=175 -> CLXXV
  i=176 -> CLXXVI
  i=177 -> CLXXVII
  i=178 -> CLXXVIII
  i=179 -> CLXXIX
  i=180 -> CLXXX
  i=181 -> CLXXXI
  i=182 -> CLXXXII
  i=183 -> CLXXXIII
  i=184 -> CLXXXIV
  i=185 -> CLXXXV
  i=186 -> CLXXXVI
  i=187 -> CLXXXVII
  i=188 -> CLXXXVIII
  i=189 -> CLXXXIX
  i=190 -> CXC
  i=191 -> CXCI
  i=192 -> CXCII
  i=193 -> CXCIII
  i=194 -> CXCIV
  i=195 -> CXCV
  i=196 -> CXCVI
  i=197 -> CXCVII
  i=198 -> CXCVIII
  i=199 -> CXCIX
  i=200 -> CC
  i=201 -> CCI
  i=202 -> CCII
  i=203 -> CCIII
  i=204 -> CCIV
  i=205 -> CCV
  i=206 -> CCVI
  i=207 -> CCVII
  i=208 -> CCVIII
  i=209 -> CCIX
  i=210 -> CCX
  i=211 -> CCXI
  i=212 -> CCXII
  i=213 -> CCXIII
  i=214 -> CCXIV
  i=215 -> CCXV
  i=216 -> CCXVI
  i=217 -> CCXVII
  i=218 -> CCXVIII
  i=219 -> CCXIX
  i=220 -> CCXX
  i=221 -> CCXXI
  i=222 -> CCXXII
  i=223 -> CCXXIII
  i=224 -> CCXXIV
  i=225 -> CCXXV
  i=226 -> CCXXVI
  i=227 -> CCXXVII
  i=228 -> CCXXVIII
  i=229 -> CCXXIX
  i=230 -> CCXXX
  i=231 -> CCXXXI
  i=232 -> CCXXXII
  i=233 -> CCXXXIII
  i=234 -> CCXXXIV
  i=235 -> CCXXXV
  i=236 -> CCXXXVI
  i=237 -> CCXXXVII
  i=238 -> CCXXXVIII
  i=239 -> CCXXXIX
  i=240 -> CCXL
  i=241 -> CCXLI
  i=242 -> CCXLII
  i=243 -> CCXLIII
  i=244 -> CCXLIV
  i=245 -> CCXLV
  i=246 -> CCXLVI
  i=247 -> CCXLVII
  i=248 -> CCXLVIII
  i=249 -> CCXLIX
  i=250 -> CCL
  i=251 -> CCLI
  i=252 -> CCLII
  i=253 -> CCLIII
  i=254 -> CCLIV
  i=255 -> CCLV
share|improve this answer

I am curious how this is going to end up. I'd start looking into the mapping 1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10 to I,II,III,IV,V,VI,VII,VII,IX,X ... then you might look into the rule for roman numbers: I,II,III are created by concatentation V, X, L, C, D and M are symbols for 5, 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 The romans thought that they could save space in writing numbers by instead of writing e.g. IIII for 4 use IV (meaning: 5 minus 1 ...) You might want to look into those rules e.g. at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_numerals and capture them in code e.g. in a class "RomanNumbers" If you would like to cheat you might want to follow the link http://www.moxlotus.alternatifs.eu/programmation-converter.html

share|improve this answer
String convert(int i){

    String ones = "";
    String tens = "";
    String hundreds = "";
    String thousands = "";
    String result ;

    boolean error = false;

    Vector v = new Vector();

    //assign passed integer to temporary value temp
    int temp=i;

    //flags an error if number is greater than 3999
    if (temp >=4000) {
       error = true;
    }

    /*loops while temp can no more be divided by 10.
        Lets say i = 3254, then temp is also 3254 at line 14.

                           3254 
          3254/10 = 25    /   \ 3254%10 = 4
                         /     \
    now temp = 25       325     4  - here 4 is added to the vector v's 0th index.
                        / \
    now temp = 32     32   5  - here 5 is added to the vector v's 1st index.
                     /  \
    now temp = 3    3    2  - here 2 is added to the vector v's 2nd index, and loop exits
                   / \        since temp/10 = 0
                  0   3  - here 3 is not added to the vector v's 3rd index as loop exits when
                            temp/10 = 0.


    */
    while (temp/10 != 0) {
        if (temp / 10 != 0 && temp <4000) {
            v.add(temp%10);
            temp = temp / 10;
        }else {     
            break;
        }
    }

    //therefore you have to add temp one last time to the vector
    v.add(temp);

    //as in the example now you have 4,5,2,3 respectively in v's 0,1,2,3 indices.


    for (int j = 0; j < v.size(); j++) {

        //you see that v's 0th index has number of ones. So make them roman ones here.
        if (j==0) {
            switch (v.get(0).toString()){
                case "0" : ones = ""; break;
                case "1" : ones = "I"; break;
                case "2" : ones = "II"; break;
                case "3" : ones = "III"; break;
                case "4" : ones = "IV"; break;
                case "5" : ones = "V"; break;
                case "6" : ones = "VI"; break;
                case "7" : ones = "VII"; break;
                case "8" : ones = "VIII"; break;
                case "9" : ones = "IX"; break;
            }


            //in the second iteration of the loop (when j==1) 
            //index 1 of v is checked. Now you understand that v's 1st index
            //has the tens
        } else if (j == 1) {
            switch (v.get(1).toString()){
                case "0" : tens = ""; break;
                case "1" : tens = "X"; break;
                case "2" : tens = "XX"; break;
                case "3" : tens = "XXX"; break;
                case "4" : tens = "XL"; break;
                case "5" : tens = "L"; break;
                case "6" : tens = "LX"; break;
                case "7" : tens = "LXX"; break;
                case "8" : tens = "LXXX"; break;
                case "9" : tens = "XC"; break;
            }
        } else if(j == 2){  //and hundreds
            switch (v.get(2).toString()){
                case "0" : hundreds = ""; break;
                case "1" : hundreds = "C"; break;
                case "2" : hundreds = "CC"; break;
                case "3" : hundreds = "CCC"; break;
                case "4" : hundreds = "CD"; break;
                case "5" : hundreds = "D"; break;
                case "6" : hundreds = "DC"; break;
                case "7" : hundreds = "DCC"; break;
                case "8" : hundreds = "DCCC"; break;
                case "9" : hundreds = "CM"; break;
            }
        }   else if(j == 3){ //and finally thousands.
            switch (v.get(3).toString()){           
                case "0" : thousands = ""; break;
                case "1" : thousands = "M"; break;
                case "2" : thousands = "MM"; break;
                case "3" : thousands = "MMM"; break;

            }
        } 
    }



    if (error) {
       result = "Error!";
    }else{
        result = thousands + hundreds + tens + ones;
    }

    return result;

}
share|improve this answer

My solution is in function getRoman:

public  String getRoman(int number) {

    String riman[] = {"M","XM","CM","D","XD","CD","C","XC","L","XL","X","IX","V","IV","I"};
    int arab[] = {1000, 990, 900, 500, 490, 400, 100, 90, 50, 40, 10, 9, 5, 4, 1};
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    int i = 0;
    while (number > 0 || arab.length == (i - 1)) {
        while ((number - arab[i]) >= 0) {
            number -= arab[i];
            result.append(riman[i]);
        }
        i++;
    }
    return result.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
perfect! cheers –  mbdavis Apr 6 '14 at 13:06
    
The above method does not work correctly in all cases. For the integer 3992 it prints out MMMXMII, when it should print out MMMCMXCII –  Saf Sep 4 '14 at 19:29
    
it's not correct, if the input is 490, will output "XD" instead of "CDXC" –  rekinyz Jan 27 at 16:01

After seeing some of the answers here I had to post this. I think that my algorithm is far the most easiest to understand and the bit of performance lost is not important even on a relatively large scale. I'm also obeying the standardized coding conventions as opposed to some of the users here.

Average conversion time: 0.05ms (based on converting all numbers 1-3999 and dividing by 3999)

public static String getRomanNumeral(int arabicNumber) {

    if (arabicNumber > 0 && arabicNumber < 4000) {

        final LinkedHashMap<Integer, String> numberLimits = 
            new LinkedHashMap<>();

        numberLimits.put(1, "I");
        numberLimits.put(4, "IV");
        numberLimits.put(5, "V");
        numberLimits.put(9, "IX");
        numberLimits.put(10, "X");
        numberLimits.put(40, "XL");
        numberLimits.put(50, "L");
        numberLimits.put(90, "XC");
        numberLimits.put(100, "C");
        numberLimits.put(400, "CD");
        numberLimits.put(500, "D");
        numberLimits.put(900, "CM");
        numberLimits.put(1000, "M");

        String romanNumeral = "";

        while (arabicNumber > 0) {
            int highestFound = 0;
            for (Map.Entry<Integer, String> current : numberLimits.entrySet()){
                if (current.getKey() <= arabicNumber) {
                    highestFound = current.getKey();
                }
            }
            romanNumeral += numberLimits.get(highestFound);
            arabicNumber -= highestFound;
        }

        return romanNumeral;

    } else {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException(arabicNumber 
            + " is not a valid Roman numeral.");
    }
}

First you have to take into account that Roman numerals are only in the interval of <1-4000), but that can be solved by a simple if and a thrown exception. Then you can try to find the largest set roman numeral in a given integer and if found subtract it from the original number and add it to the result. Repeat with the newly acquired number until you hit zero.

share|improve this answer

A compact implementation using Java TreeMap and recursion:

import java.util.TreeMap;

public class RomanNumber {

     final static TreeMap<Integer, String> map = new TreeMap<Integer, String>();

    static {

        map.put(1000, "M");
        map.put(900, "CM");
        map.put(500, "D");
        map.put(400, "CD");
        map.put(100, "C");
        map.put(90, "XC");
        map.put(50, "L");
        map.put(40, "XL");
        map.put(10, "X");
        map.put(9, "X");
        map.put(5, "V");
        map.put(4, "IV");
        map.put(1, "I");

    }

    public final static String toRoman(int number) {
        int l =  map.floorKey(number);
        if ( number == l ) {
            return map.get(number);
        }
        return map.get(l) + toRoman(number-l);
    }

}

Testing:

public void testRomanConversion() {

    for (int i = 1; i<= 100; i++) {
        System.out.println(i+"\t =\t "+RomanNumber.toRoman(i));
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Alternative solution based on the OP's own solution by utilizing an enum. Additionally, a parser and round-trip tests are included.

public class RomanNumber {
    public enum Digit {
        M(1000, 3),
        CM(900, 1),
        D(500, 1),
        CD(400, 1),
        C(100, 3),
        XC(90, 1),
        L(50, 1),
        XL(40, 1),
        X(10, 3),
        IX(9, 1),
        V(5, 1),
        IV(4, 1),
        I(1, 3);

        public final int value;
        public final String symbol = name();
        public final int maxArity;

        private Digit(int value, int maxArity) {
            this.value = value;
            this.maxArity = maxArity;
        }
    }

    private static final Digit[] DIGITS = Digit.values();

    public static String of(int number) {
        if (number < 1 || 3999 < number) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format(
                    "Roman numbers are only defined for numbers between 1 and 3999 (%d was given)",
                    number
            ));
        }

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (Digit digit : DIGITS) {
            int value = digit.value;
            String symbol = digit.symbol;

            while (number >= value) {
                sb.append(symbol);
                number -= value;
            }
        }

        return sb.toString();
    }

    public static int parse(String roman) {
        if (roman.isEmpty()) {
            throw new NumberFormatException("The empty string does not comprise a valid Roman number");
        }

        int number = 0;
        int offset = 0;
        for (Digit digit : DIGITS) {
            int value = digit.value;
            int maxArity = digit.maxArity;
            String symbol = digit.symbol;

            for (int i = 0; i < maxArity && roman.startsWith(symbol, offset); i++) {
                number += value;
                offset += symbol.length();
            }
        }
        if (offset != roman.length()) {
            throw new NumberFormatException(String.format(
                    "The string '%s' does not comprise a valid Roman number",
                    roman
            ));
        }
        return number;
    }

    /** TESTS */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        /* Demonstrating round-trip for all possible inputs. */

        for (int number = 1; number <= 3999; number++) {
            String roman = of(number);
            int parsed = parse(roman);
            if (parsed != number) {
                System.err.format(
                        "ERROR: number: %d, roman: %s, parsed: %d\n",
                        number,
                        roman,
                        parsed
                );
            }
        }

        /* Some illegal inputs. */

        int[] illegalNumbers = { -1, 0, 4000, 4001 };
        for (int illegalNumber : illegalNumbers) {
            try {
                of(illegalNumber);
                System.err.format(
                        "ERROR: Expected failure on number %d\n",
                        illegalNumber
                );
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // Failed as expected.
            }
        }

        String[] illegalRomans = { "MMMM", "CDCD", "IM", "T", "", "VV", "DM" };
        for (String illegalRoman : illegalRomans) {
            try {
                parse(illegalRoman);
                System.err.format(
                        "ERROR: Expected failure on roman %s\n",
                        illegalRoman
                );
            } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                // Failed as expected.
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think if you study the theory of roman numerals carefully you don't require mappings for numbers 4,9,40 etc because the theory tells us if the roman numeral is IV = 5-1 = 4, hence when the prefix is smaller than the succeeding number in that case you have to subtract the former number from the succeeding number to get the actual value and this is what I have incorporated into my code for the problem, take a look and point out any mistakes if necessary, I followed this table to devise my logic - http://literacy.kent.edu/Minigrants/Cinci/romanchart.htm

import java.util.Set;
import java.io.File;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.BufferedReader;

public class RomanStringToIntegerConversion {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException{
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in)));
        String[] romanString = br.readLine().split("");

        HashMap<String, Integer> romanToIntegerMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        romanToIntegerMap.put("I", 1);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("V", 5);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("X", 10);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("L", 50);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("C", 100);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("D", 500);
        romanToIntegerMap.put("M", 1000);

        int numLength = romanString.length;
        Set<Integer> lessIndices = new HashSet<Integer>();

        for(int i = 0; i < numLength; ++i){
            if(i+1 < numLength){
                if(romanToIntegerMap.get(romanString[i]) < romanToIntegerMap.get(romanString[i+1]))
                    lessIndices.add(i);
            }
        }

        int num = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < numLength;){
            if(!lessIndices.contains(i)){
                num = num + romanToIntegerMap.get(romanString[i]);
                ++i;
            }
            else{
                num = num + romanToIntegerMap.get(romanString[i+1]) - romanToIntegerMap.get(romanString[i]);
                i+=2;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("The integer representation of the roman numeral is : " + num);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

After doing some research and analysing answers above, I ended up with this:

package roman;

public class RomanNumbers {


public static final int[] decimal = {1, 4, 5, 9, 10, 40, 50, 90, 100, 400, 500, 900, 1000};
public static final String[] letters = {"I", "IV", "V", "IX", "X", "XL", "L", "XC", "C", "CD", "D", "CM", "M"};

public static String stringToRoman(int num) {
    String roman = "";

    if (num < 1 || num > 3999) {
        System.out.println("Invalid roman number value!");
    }

    while (num > 0) {
        int maxFound = 0;
        for (int i=0; i < decimal.length; i++) {
            if (num >= decimal[i]) {
                maxFound = i;
            }
        }
        roman += letters[maxFound];
        num -= decimal[maxFound];
    }

    return roman;       
  }
}

Unit tests also passed:

package roman;

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

import org.junit.Test;

public class RomanNumbersTest {

@Test
public void testReturn1() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(1);
    String expected = "I";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}

@Test
public void testReturn5() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(5);
    String expected = "V";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}

@Test
public void testReturn2() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(2);
    String expected = "II";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}

@Test
public void testReturn4() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(4);
    String expected = "IV";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}

@Test
public void testReturn399() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(399);
    String expected = "CCCXCIX";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}

@Test
public void testReturn3992() {
    String actual = RomanNumbers.stringToRoman(3992);
    String expected = "MMMCMXCII";
    assertEquals(expected, actual);
}
}
share|improve this answer

I noticed that it's quite easy to translate from integer to Roman Numeral, because there's always sort of 1, 5 and 10 for every digit (i.e. I, V and X for 1-10, X, L and C for 10-100 etc.) That's why I made an array of Roman Numerals to get the right letter from.

In my example, I go through the whole number one digit per time, using modulo operator to get the last digit each time. Then I form the Roman Numeral from current digit inside a switch-statement, adding it in the beginning of asRomanNumerals String. After the digit has been translated, it gets removed from the number and index used to look for letter in array gets increased with two (IVX -> XLC).

public static void main(String[] args) {

    // number is the one to be translated into Roman Numerals
    int number = 2345;
    number = Math.min(3999, Math.max(1, number)); // wraps number between 1-3999
    String asRomanNumerals = "";

    // Array including numerals in ascending order
    String[] RN = {"I", "V", "X", "L", "C", "D", "M" };
    int i = 0; // Index used to keep track which digit we are translating
    while (number > 0) {
        switch(number % 10) {
        case 1: asRomanNumerals = RN[i] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 2: asRomanNumerals = RN[i] + RN[i] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 3: asRomanNumerals = RN[i] + RN[i] + RN[i] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 4: asRomanNumerals = RN[i] + RN[i + 1] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 5: asRomanNumerals = RN[i + 1] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 6: asRomanNumerals = RN[i + 1] + RN[i] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 7: asRomanNumerals = RN[i + 1] + RN[i] + RN[i] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 8: asRomanNumerals = RN[i + 1] + RN[i] + RN[i] + RN[i] +asRomanNumerals; break;
        case 9: asRomanNumerals = RN[i] + RN[i + 2] + asRomanNumerals; break;
        }
        number = (int) number / 10;
        i += 2;
    }
    System.out.println(asRomanNumerals);
}
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