Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My User migration used to look like this:

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.string :login
      etc

Now it looks like this:

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.string :username
      etc

Why, then, do I see this?

rake db:drop
rake db:create
rake db:migrate
rails console
> User.new
+----+-------+------------------+---------------+-------------------+------------+------------+
| id | login | crypted_password | password_salt | persistence_token | created_at | updated_at |
+----+-------+------------------+---------------+-------------------+------------+------------+
|    |       |                  |               |                   |            |            |
+----+-------+------------------+---------------+-------------------+------------+------------+
1 row in set

I am using PostgreSQL.

share|improve this question
    
Did you change an existing migration, or did you add a new one? –  Adam Eberlin Oct 19 '12 at 6:11
    
I changed an existing one –  steven_noble Oct 19 '12 at 6:13
    
You inspired to change on digit in the filename of the migration and that forced it to reload. Rails must have been caching the migration's contents. Thanks. –  steven_noble Oct 19 '12 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Incrementing the filename of the User migration solved the problem. I presume Rails was caching the contents of the migration when I tried to change its contents without changing the filename.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.