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#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
class term
{
public:
    int exp;
    int coeff;  
};
class poly
{
public:
    term* term_ptr;
    int no_term;

    poly(int d);
    friend istream& operator>>(istream& in, poly& p);
    friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const poly& p);
    friend poly operator+(const poly& p1, const poly& p2);
};
poly::poly(int d=0)
{
    no_term = d;
    term_ptr = new term[no_term];
}
istream& operator>>(istream& in, poly& p)
{
    in>>p.no_term;
    for(int i= 0; i<p.no_term; i++)
    {
        in>>(p.term_ptr+i)->coeff;
        in>>(p.term_ptr+i)->exp;
    }
    return in;
}

i overloaded the input operator to input the object. The problem I am facing is when i input two objects consequtively the data member of the first object input changes.

int main(void)
{
    poly p1, p2;
    cin>>p1;
    cin>>p2;
    cout<<p1;
    cout<<p2;
    return 0;   
}

if the input is

 3
 1 1
 1 2
 1 3
 3
 1 1
 1 2
 1 3

the output i get is

1 1
1 2 
1 1
1 1
1 2
1 3

the output operator function is

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const poly& p)
{
    out<<"coeff"<<" "<<"power"<<endl;
    for(int i = 0; i< p.no_term; i++)
        out<<(p.term_ptr+i)->coeff<<" "<<(p.term_ptr+i)->exp<<endl;
    return out;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You initially allocate an array with zero elements. When reading the objects you read the number of terms but you don't reallocate the array of terms. I would personally recommend to use a suitable container type, e.g., std::vector<term*> or, actually, std::vector<std::shared_ptr<term>>. If you stick with arrays, you'd need something like this:

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, poly& p)
{
    if (in>>p.no_terms ) {
        std::unique_ptr<term[]> terms(new term[p.no_terms]);
        for(int i= 0; i<p.no_term; i++)
        {
            in >> terms[i].coeff;
            in >> terms[i].exp;
        }
        if (in) {
            delete[] p.term_ptr;
            p.term_ptr = terms.release();
        }
    }
    return in;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 but why use pointers at all? std::vector<term> should be adequate. –  Praetorian Oct 19 '12 at 6:24
    
@Praetorian: yes, you are right. I didn't pay too much attention to what the type actually does, I have to admit... –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 19 '12 at 6:25

Change poly p1, p2; to poly p1(3), p2(3);.

p.no_term has a value of 3, however, look at your poly constructor:

poly::poly(int d=0)
{
    no_term = d;
    term_ptr = new term[no_term];
}

You are creating an array of 0 length. Also, no need to use pointer in your code. Here is an example using std::vector<term>:

#include<iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
class term
{
    public:
    int exp;
    int coeff;  
};
class poly
{
    public:
    std::vector<term> term_vec;
    int no_term;

            poly(int d);
            friend istream& operator>>(istream& in, poly& p);
            friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const poly& p);
            friend poly operator+(const poly& p1, const poly& p2);
};
poly::poly(int d=0) : term_vec(d), no_term(d)
{
}
istream& operator>>(istream& in, poly& p)
{
    in>>p.no_term;
    p.term_vec.resize(p.no_term);
    for(int i= 0; i<p.no_term; i++)
    {
        in>> p.term_vec[i].coeff;
        in>> p.term_vec[i].exp;
    }
    return in;
}

  ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const poly& p)
   {
    out<<"coeff"<<" "<<"power"<<endl;
    for(int i = 0; i< p.no_term; i++)
    out<<p.term_vec[i].coeff<<" "<<p.term_vec[i].exp<<endl;
    return out;
   }

   int main(void)
 {
    poly p1, p2;
    cin>>p1;
    cin>>p2;
    cout<<p1;
    cout<<p2;
    return 0;   
 }
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Your default constructor argument d has value 0. Then you call new term[0]. Pointers that initialize as arrays with 0 length is pointed in same location in your example. After your fill non-valid memory and see same results.

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