Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a list like this:

a = ['hello','1','hi',2,'something','3'] 

I want to convert the numbers in the list into float while keeping the strings.

I wrote this:

for i in a:
    try:
        i = float(i)
    except ValueError:
        pass

Is there a more efficient and neat way to do this?

share|improve this question
5  
Are the numbers always in the same locations? –  gnibbler Oct 19 '12 at 6:32
add comment

5 Answers

Based on what you've already tried:

a = ['hello', '1.0', 'hi', 2, 'blah blah', '3']

def float_or_string(item):
    try:
        return float(item)
    except ValueError:
        return item


a = map(float_or_string, mylist)

Should do the trick. I'd say that a try:... except:... block is both a) efficient and b) neat. As halex pointed out, map() does not change the list in place, it returns a new list, and you set a equal to it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You're changing the value of the variable i -> The content of the array a does not change! If you want to change the values in the array, you should rather implement it like this:

for index, value in enumerate(a):
    try :
        a[index] = float(value)
    except ValueError :
        pass
share|improve this answer
add comment

The try/except way is the Pythonic way of doing it, but if you really hate it, see if this serves your purpose:

a = ['hello','1','hi',2,'something','3']  

pattern = re.compile(r'^(-?\d+)(\.\d+)?') 

b = [float(item) if isinstance(item, str) and re.match(pattern, item) 
else item for item in a] 
share|improve this answer
1  
Regex? Seems kind of like killing cockroaches with a shotgun :) –  Joel Cornett Oct 19 '12 at 6:45
1  
@JoelCornett Haha, I thought the OP does not like the try/except way of doing this, so maybe re is better for him. –  Spirit Zhang Oct 19 '12 at 7:03
add comment

I think this is short and better way :

a = ['hello','1','hi',2,'something','3']

for index,value in enumerate(a):

     if isinstance(value,int):

             a[index] = float(value)

print a

OUTPUT IS:['hello', '1', 'hi', 2.0, 'something', '3']

share|improve this answer
add comment

What's about my short example:

a = ['hello','1','hi',2,'something','3']

for i, item in enumerate(a):
    if str(item).isdigit():
        a[i] = float(item)

print a
share|improve this answer
1  
It would break on "1.0". Not sure if OP plans on having any of those, though. –  Joel Cornett Oct 19 '12 at 6:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.