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I'm teaching my self C++.

I'm trying to combine polynomials. For this I have defined straightforward classes: Polynomial<T>, Term<T> and Coefficient<T> (which may also just be complex<T>) using simple value composition. I have defined the required operator overloads.

Polynomial's compare by sorting their terms (std::sort).

I am working on combineLikeTerms(); This method when called will first call another member method that will sort this vector of Terms. For example:

4x^3 + 5x^2 + 3x - 4 

would be a possible resulting sorted vector.

Question:

I am using two iterators on this vector and Im trying to merge adjacent terms of the same order.

Lets say our initial vector after being sorted is this:

4x^3 - 2x^3 + x^3 - 2x^2 + x ...

after the function completes its iterations the temp stack vector would then look like this 2x^3 + x^3 - 2x^2 + x ... if we look there are still like terms this needs to be refactored again.

How do I do this? I'm thinking of using recursion.

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
// setPolynomialByDegreeOfExponent()
// should be called before combineLikeTerms
template <class T>
void Polynomial<T>::setPolynomialByDegreeOfExponent()
{
    unsigned int uiIndex = _uiNumTerms - 1;
    if ( uiIndex < 1 )
    {
        return;
    }
    struct _CompareOperator_
    {
        bool operator() ( math::Term<T> a, Term<T> b )
        {
            return ( a.getDegreeOfTerm() > b.getDegreeOfTerm() );
        } // operator()
    };
    stable_sort( _vTerms.begin(), _vTerms.end(), _CompareOperator_() );
} // setPolynomialByDegreeOfExponent

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
// addLikeTerms()
template <class T>
bool Polynomial<T>::addLikeTerms( const Term<T>& termA, const Term<T>& termB, Term<T>& result ) const
{
    if ( termA.termsAreAlike( termB ) )
    {
        result = termA + termB;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
} // addLikeTerms

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------- //
// combineLikeTerms()
template <class T>
void Polynomial<T>::combineLikeTerms()
{
    // First We Order Our Terms.
    setPolynomialByDegreeOfExponent();
    // Nothing To Do Then
    if ( _vTerms.size() == 1 )
    {
        return;
    }
    Term<T> result; // Temp Variable
    // No Need To Do The Work Below This If Statement This Is Simpler
    if ( _vTerms.size() == 2 )
    {
        if ( addLikeTerms( _vTerms.at(0), _vTerms.at(1) )
    {
        _vTerms.clear();
            _vTerms.push_back( result );
        }
        return;
    }
    // For 3 Ore More Terms
    std::vector<Term<T>> vTempTerms; // Temp storage
    std::vector<Term<T>>::iterator it = _vTerms.begin();
    std::vector<Term<T>>::iterator it2 = _vTerms.begin()+1;
    bool bFound = addLikeTerms( *it, *it2, result );

    while ( it2 != _vTerms.end() )
    {
        if ( bFound )
        {
            // Odd Case Last Three Elems
            if ( (it2 == (_vTerms.end()-2)) && (it2+1) == (_vTerms.end()-1)) )
            {
                vTempTerms.push_back( result );
                vTempTerms.push_back( _vTerms.back() );
                break;
            }
            // Even Case Last Two Elems
            else if ( (it2 == (_vTerms.end()-1)) && (it == (_vTerms.end()-2)) )
            {
                vTempTerms.push_back( result );
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                vTempTerms.push_back( result );
                it += 2;    // Increment by 2
                it2 += 2;          "
                bFound = addLikeTerms( *it, *it2, result );
            }
            }
                else {
                // Push Only First One
                vTempTerms.push_back( *it );
                it++;   // Increment By 1
                it2++;         "
                // Test Our Second Iterator
                if ( it2 == _vTerms.end() )
                {
                    vTempTerms.push_back( *(--it2) );  // same as using _vTerms.back()
                }
                else
                {
                    bFound = addLikeTerms( *it, *it2, result );
                }
            }
        }
        // Now That We Have Went Through Our Container, We Need To Update It
        _vTerms.clear();
        _vTerms = vTempTerms;
        // At This point our stack variable should contain all elements from above,
        // however this temp variable can still have like terms in it.
        // ??? Were do I call the recursion and how do I define the base case
        // to stop the execution of the recursion where the base case is a
        // sorted std::vector of Term<T> objects that no two terms that are alike...
        // I do know that the recursion has to happen after the above while loop
    } // combineLikeTerms

Can someone help me find the next step? I'd be happy to hear about any bugs/efficiency issues in the code shown. I love c++

share|improve this question
3  
Whoa. Perhaps you could word the question a bit more to the point. This is going to be TL;DR I fear. (Also, formatting helps) –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 6:42
    
Where is your polynomial class defined? Why isn't it stored internally as just a vector of its co-efficients? Does it need to be a template? Will its parameter type ever be anything other than double? Yeah, I see in your example the co-efficients are all ints but double makes more sense or is this "exercise of using templates". –  CashCow Oct 19 '12 at 6:56
1  
I have taken the liberty of trimming the prose down a bit. I feel this will help people see the question. –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 6:59
1  
@FrancisCugler I took it out because the way I read it you asked whether recursion was the appropriate way here. Sorry if that misrepresented your question. Regardless, I think you have two answers you should be able to proceed with –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 7:23
1  
@FrancisCugler In C++ identifiers that started with _ and followed by an upper case letter and identifiers that contain __ are reserved for compiler developers and you should never use them. You have so many identifiers for your classes and functions, so why use something like _CompareOperator_ that is forbidden by rules? –  BigBoss Oct 19 '12 at 7:48
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's my take on it in modern C++.

Note the extra optimization of dropping terms with an effective coefficient of zero

Self contained sample: http://liveworkspace.org/code/ee68769826a80d4c7dc314e9b792052b

Update: posted a c++03 version of this http://ideone.com/aHuB8

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct Term
{
    T coeff;
    int exponent;
};

template <typename T>
struct Poly
{
    typedef Term<T> term_t;
    std::vector<term_t> _terms;

    Poly(std::vector<term_t> terms) : _terms(terms) { }

    void combineLikeTerms()
    {
        if (_terms.empty())
            return;

        std::vector<term_t> result;

        std::sort(_terms.begin(), _terms.end(), 
                [] (term_t const& a, term_t const& b) { return a.exponent > b.exponent; });

        term_t accum = { T(), 0 };

        for(auto curr=_terms.begin(); curr!=_terms.end(); ++curr)
        {
            if (curr->exponent == accum.exponent)
                accum.coeff += curr->coeff;
            else
            {
                if (accum.coeff != 0)
                    result.push_back(accum);
                accum = *curr;
            }
        }        
        if (accum.coeff != 0)
            result.push_back(accum);

        std::swap(_terms, result); // only update if no exception
    }
};

int main()
{
    Poly<int> demo({ { 4, 1 }, { 6, 7 }, {-3, 1 }, { 5, 5 } });

    demo.combineLikeTerms();

    for (auto it = demo._terms.begin(); it!= demo._terms.end(); ++it)
        std::cout << (it->coeff>0? " +" : " ") << it->coeff << "x^" << it->exponent;

    std::cout << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
A perfect piece of code (of course)! @FrancisCugler: This is a better fit with your existing code because the interface of combineLikeTerms here is exactly like yours. But the main point is the same as I described: No need for recusion and the like. –  jogojapan Oct 19 '12 at 7:29
    
Your combineLikeTerms: for() should include ++first, otherwise it won't work as expected. –  Olaf Dietsche Oct 19 '12 at 8:02
    
@OlafDietsche oh, ah, hehe. Fixed by removing the second iterator at all, which was unneeded anyway. Less confusing this way :). Thanks –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 8:24
    
@FrancisCugler In case you needed help/reassurance this can be done in C++03: ideone.com/aHuB8 –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 8:42
1  
@jogojapan srry about that, im also having some trouble seeing the text, my monitor is dying, my new one should be here sometime from friday to monday. the pincuhsion isn't holding so my whole desktop looks like an hour glass and everything is skewed –  Francis Cugler Oct 19 '12 at 9:06
show 3 more comments

You need to look at the polynomial as a sequence of pairs (coefficient,variable):

[(coefficient1,variable1),(coefficient2,variable2),(coefficient3,variable3),...]

As you describe, you iterate through this from left to right, combining two adjacent pairs into one whenever the variable part is identical (this of course assumes that the list has already been sorted by the variable part!).

Now what happens when there are three or more elements in this list that share their variables? Well, then just keep combining them. There is no need for recursion or anything complicated, really.

At any point during the iteration you combine the variable part of the current pair with the variable part last seen. If they are identical, you combine them and simply continue. If the next pair you get still has the same variable part as the one last seen, well then you combine them again. If you do this correctly, there shouldn't be any duplicates left.

Here is an example of how to do this. It works by creating a new pair list, then iterating through the input list, for each item of the input list it decides whether to either combine it with the item last pushed to the new list, or by adding a new element to the new list:

#include <utility>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

typedef std::vector<std::pair<float,std::string>> Polynomial;

Polynomial combine_like_terms(const Polynomial &poly)
{
  if (poly.empty())
    return poly;

  /* Here we store the new, cleaned-up polynomial: */
  Polynomial clean_poly;

  /* Now we iterate: */    
  auto it = begin(poly);
  clean_poly.push_back(*it);
  ++it;
  while (it != end(poly)) {
    if (clean_poly.back().second == it->second)
      clean_poly.back().first += it->first; // Like term found!
    else
      clean_poly.push_back(*it); // Sequence of like-terms ended!
    ++it;
  }
  return clean_poly;
}

int main()
{
  Polynomial polynomial {
    { 1.0 , "x^2" },
    { 1.4 , "x^3" },
    { 2.6 , "x^3" },
    { 0.2 , "x^3" },
    { 2.3 , "x" },
    { 0.7 , "x" }
  };

  Polynomial clean_polynomial = combine_like_terms(polynomial);
  for (auto term : clean_polynomial)
    std::cout << '(' << term.first << ',' << term.second << ")\n";
  std::cout.flush();

  return 0;
}

You can easily make this templated again if you need to – I used float for the coefficients and strings for the variable part. It's really just a code example to show how this can be done easily without recursion or lots of iterators used in parallel.

Oh, and the code is written for C++11. Again, it's just a model and can be adjusted for C++03.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ha. We think alike. I considered making that a non-mutating algorithm. But I elected to just go with the interface the OP described :) –  sehe Oct 19 '12 at 7:21
1  
very nice responses :)), however i do not have c++11 or vs 2012 :( im still on Vista lol.... :( but atleast I still have the use of the auto keyword since im using 2010. Yeah, I thought there was an easier way then recursion, however, when I tried doing it with the two methods obove for some reason, I ended up adding one of the terms twice, and when I branched to using if statements then I had the problem if the size was even or odd. lol This should help alot :) –  Francis Cugler Oct 19 '12 at 8:14
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