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I intend to generate random number the following step:

  1. Read the data from file (<DATA>)
  2. Generate random numbers as many as the input data lines
  3. The random number should not be generated twice, e.g. if the rand number generated in loop no x, has been created before then, recreate the random number.

Here is the code I have which leads to infinite loop. What's wrong with my logic, and how can I fix it?

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
my %chrsize = ('chr1' =>249250621);

# For example case I have created the
# repository where a value has been inserted.
my %done =("chr1    182881372" => 1);

while ( <DATA> ) {
 chomp;
 next if (/^\#/);

 my ($chr,$pos) = split(/\s+/,$_);
 # this number has been generated before
 # with this: int(rand($chrsize{$chr}));
 # hence have to create other than this one
 my $newst =182881372;

 my $newpos = $chr ."\t".$newst;


 # recreate random number
 for (0...10){
     if ( $done{$newpos} ) {

            # INFINITE LOOP
            $newst = int(rand($chrsize{$chr}));
            redo;
     }
 }

 $done{$newpos}=1;
print "$newpos\n";

}


__DATA__
# In reality there are 20M of such lines
# name  positions
chr1    157705682
chr1    19492676
chr1    169660680
chr1    226586538
chr1    182881372
chr1    11246753
chr1    69961084
chr1    180227256
chr1    141449512
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You had a couple of errors:

  1. You were setting $newst within your loop every time, so $newpos never took on a new value.
  2. Your inner for loop didn't make sense, because you never actually changed $newpos before checking the condition again.
  3. redo; was working on the inner loop.

Here is a corrected version that avoids redo altogether.

Update: I edited the algorithm a bit to make it simpler.

 #!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
my $chr1size = 249250621;

my %done;
my $newst;

while ( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;
    next if (/^\#/);
    my ($chr,$pos) = split(/\s+/,$_);

    my $newpos;
    #This will always run at least once
    do {
        $newst = int(rand($chr1size));
        $newpos = $chr ."\t".$newst;
    } while ( $done{$newpos} );

    $done{$newpos}=1;
    print "$newpos\n";
}

Update 2: while the above algorithm will work, it will get really slow on 20,000,000 lines. Here is an alternative approach that should be faster (There is sort of a pattern to the random numbers it generates, but it would probably ok for most situations).

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
my $newst;

#make sure you have enough.  This is good if you have < 100,000,000 lines.
use List::Util qw/shuffle/;
my @rand_pieces = shuffle (0..10000);

my $pos1   = 0;
my $offset = 1;
while ( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;
    next if (/^\#/);
    my ($chr,$pos) = split(/\s+/,$_);

    $newst = $rand_pieces[$pos1] * 10000 + $rand_pieces[($pos1+$offset)%10000];
    my $newpos = $chr ."\t".$newst;

    $pos1++;
    if ($pos1 > $#rand_pieces) 
    {
        $pos1 = 0;
        $offset = ++$offset % 10000;
        if ($offset == 1) { die "Out of random numbers!"; } 
    }

    print "$newpos\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But I had to declare $newst inside the loop. Because actually it will take the $chr info and determine the size and later pass it to rand($chrsize). I've slightly modified my code to show what I mean. –  neversaint Oct 19 '12 at 8:30
1  
@neversaint, the problem was that your loop set $newst to 182881372 every single time, so it ignored the random values you were generating. Look at my simplified code. I believe this will do what you want, if I understand you correctly. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 8:51
1  
@neversaint, in order to do that, you need to loop through the file twice. Go through SNPINFILE once to fill %nonrandom_pos, then go through all the lines again to do the rest of your logic. Otherwise, when you are on the first line of your file, you won't know what other non-random numbers come later in the file, so you can't exclude them. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 9:49
1  
After you go through the file the first time, use seek SNPINFILE,0,0; to reset your file to the beginning so that you can loop through it again. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 9:50
1  
@neversaint, yes, you could use two filehandles instead. However, if you are looking at the same file, I think it is more efficient to use seek than to open the file twice. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 10:16

Add a counter to your loop like this:

my $counter = 0;
# recrate
for (0...10){
  if ( $done{$newpos} ) {
    # INFINITE LOOP
    $newst = int(rand($chr1size));
    redo if ++$counter < 100; # Safety counter
    # It will continue here if the above doesn't match and run out
    # eventually
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a stopgap measure instead of finding and fixing the real problem. Something like this should only be used when the problem by its nature might result in an endless loop. This is not a case like that. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 8:06

To get rid of the infinite loop, replace redo with next.

http://www.tizag.com/perlT/perlwhile.php : "Redo will execute the same iteration over again."

Then you may need to fix the rest of the logic ;).

share|improve this answer
1  
perldoc.perl.org/functions/redo.html –  fanlim Oct 19 '12 at 8:15

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