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sorry for my bad english.

For example :

//
// File : Main.cpp
// 
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
  printf(TEST_DEFINE);
  return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Header :

//
// File : test_define.h
//
#ifndef TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED
#define TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED

#define TEST_DEFINE

#endif

I want include that header, by the compiler or other program. I not want include this header in CPP file.

How can i process ? I'm open to all proposal.

This situation is quite tricky, but necesary for my POC program.

share|improve this question
1  
The Microsoft VC compilers have a /FI switch that forces the inclusion of a header into each source. –  hmjd Oct 19 '12 at 7:52
    
possible duplicate of C++ conditional include file runtime –  Blue Moon Oct 19 '12 at 7:52
    
have you heard about gcc compiler option -Dname=value ? –  Sergey Oct 19 '12 at 7:52
4  
For the hell of it, let's ask...why do you need to do this? What you're asking about is not really worth doing in standard C++, and the problem you're trying to solve is probably better solved some whole other way. What that way is, depends on the problem of course. –  cHao Oct 19 '12 at 7:58
    
What exactly do you mean by "dynamically"? –  wich Oct 19 '12 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

GCC has an option -include file which causes the preprocessor to include the header as though the first line of your program said #include "file"

See the manual

e.g. given a fixed version of your main (which should #include <stdio.h>):

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  printf(TEST_DEFINE);
  return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

and your header:

//
// File : test_define.h
//
#ifndef TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED
#define TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED

#define TEST_DEFINE "hello\n"

#endif

Then I can use it like this:

$ g++ -include test_define.h main.cpp -o main
$ ./main
hello
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's true. Thx –  user1758548 Oct 19 '12 at 8:44

You cannot include any header dynamically, C++ is a static language.

You need to include the header statically with #include "test_define.h"

The only alternative you have is writing a C++ parser yourself (or using an existing one), reading the header file, parsing it and extracting the symbol you want from the symbol tree. But unless you are someone with years of hardcore programming experience and can explain why you need to do this you should never ever do it.


Okay, so we're not talking about anything dynamic, we're talking about a plain old #include of a header file that contains some definitions.

What you want is the following:

A file my_header.h containing:

#ifndef TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED
#define TEST_DEFINE_H_INCLUDED

enum {foo, bar} my_enum;

#endif

And a file my_program.cc containing:

#include "my_header.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  my_enum my_variable = foo;

  return my_variable == foo ? EXIT_SUCCESS : EXIT_FAILURE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's just a function call for the example, it's just for use my define –  user1758548 Oct 19 '12 at 7:55
    
"Write C++ parser yourself" - I think it is better to remove this. Neither practical, nor reasonable. And the OP was not about this. –  Kirill Kobelev Oct 19 '12 at 8:00
    
I explorer u idea –  user1758548 Oct 19 '12 at 8:01
    
@KirillKobelev I'm just stating the facts and plainly stating that one should never ever do that if one cannot explain why it needs to be done that way. –  wich Oct 19 '12 at 8:18
    
Not really i have generate header file with enumeration, and i try to include this header by gcc or other process –  user1758548 Oct 19 '12 at 8:19

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