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What will be the sequence of inheritance and what does the following code mean

class A
{
   int a;
   virtual void display()
   {
      cout<<"A";
   }
}
class B
{
   int b;
   virtual void displayB()
   {
      cout<<"B";
   }
}
class C:public B, virtual public B
{
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Emilio Garavaglia, Jonathan Leffler, Vikdor, hauleth, Lucifer Oct 21 '12 at 1:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
did you mean class C: public A, virtual public B or is class A purely a distractor in this question? – tmpearce Oct 19 '12 at 8:06
    
class C:public B, virtual public B. This is really absurd, why would you do that ?? If you run it what happens. – DumbCoder Oct 19 '12 at 8:06
    
And did you forget class B: public A or class B: virtual public A? – Alex Oct 19 '12 at 8:06
    
I think it's a typo, one of the base classes must be A. – CashCow Oct 19 '12 at 8:18
    
What does it mean? It doesn't mean anything. Are you asking what purpose it serves or for a technical analysis of the structure? I don't mean to be flippant, but have you actually tried just compiling it and seeing what happens? You can learn a lot that way. – Component 10 Oct 19 '12 at 8:44

Virtual inheritance means the class shares its base class instance with any other classes in the hierarchy of the instantiated object that inherit from it the same way (virtually).

Non-virtual inheritance means the class gets its own instance of the base class, regardless of any other classes that inherit from the base class.

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Virtual inheritance avoids inheritance loops. For instance, this will issue a warning:

class A {
public:
    int count;
};

class B : public A {
};

class C : public B, public A {
};

Gives:

prog.cpp:9: warning: direct base ‘A’ inaccessible in ‘C’ due to ambiguity 

Because for C the inheritance from A is ambiguous (it inherits directly from A but it also inherits from A through B).

This will compile without warnings:

class A {
public:
    int count;
};

class B : virtual public A {
};

class C : public B, virtual public A {
};

Because C has only one shared instance of A.

share|improve this answer
    
@Alex You're right, it just issues an ambiguity warning... (i'll edit my answer) But does it do what you expect? Isn't this an undefined behaviour? – alestanis Oct 19 '12 at 12:41
    
No, it's not undefined behaviour. The problem with your answer is that although it's factually true now, the problem in the code is not the reason virtual inheritance exists. The problem is with accessing the direct base class A. But the solution is not to use virtual inheritance - that would be equivalent to just dropping A as a direct base class. The solution is to introduce an intermediate class (say, AccessibleA), make A it's parent, and inherit from it. I'm reversing my -1 but I can't give you a +1 for this answer. – Alex Oct 19 '12 at 14:18
    
@Alex Thank you for reversing and for the detailed explanation. Why does virtual inheritance exists then? – alestanis Oct 19 '12 at 15:07

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