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I have been looking through wordpress's core files and stumbled across this piece of code, I noticed it had an ampersand before a variable name and after an =.

I have tried searching this and came across this from the PHP manual and it doesn't explain it well, or I'm looking at the wrong one! I also saw that it is used to modify a variable outside of the method where it is being used, but, thats what a variable is there for, to be modified so if this is correct how would one use it?

function _make_cat_compat( &$category ) {

    if ( is_object( $category ) ) {
        $category->cat_ID = &$category->term_id;
        $category->category_count = &$category->count;
        $category->category_description = &$category->description;
        $category->cat_name = &$category->name;
        $category->category_nicename = &$category->slug;
        $category->category_parent = &$category->parent;
    } elseif ( is_array( $category ) && isset( $category['term_id'] ) ) {
        $category['cat_ID'] = &$category['term_id'];
        $category['category_count'] = &$category['count'];
        $category['category_description'] = &$category['description'];
        $category['cat_name'] = &$category['name'];
        $category['category_nicename'] = &$category['slug'];
        $category['category_parent'] = &$category['parent'];
    }
}
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This means the function will modify the argument (by reference) instead working on a copy of it. Remove all the ampersands inside the body of the function, only the one in the argument is necessary.

BTW, you can do this:

function _make_cat_compat( &$category ) {
    if (is_array( $category)) {
        $category = (object)$category;
    }

    $category->cat_ID = $category->term_id;
    $category->category_count = $category->count;
    $category->category_description = $category->description;
    $category->cat_name = $category->name;
    $category->category_nicename = $category->slug;
    $category->category_parent = $category->parent;
}

Looks cleaner to me, but I don't know your specific case. And I don't know how you would have either array or object - it implies some bad practices used.

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Thanks for the answer! I dont understand why someone would need to use the amp before a variable still, but maybe I havent done anything that would require it. Its wordpress's code, if you ask me, its a mess! As is their database! Be it third normal form, its still horrendous! –  zomboble Oct 19 '12 at 9:04
    
If its in the argument - as I said, its passing by reference, so that the function will modify whatever you call it with. But why would someone do that in the body of the function - I don't know. Probably copy/paste or just lack of experience and knowledge. –  Veseliq Oct 19 '12 at 9:07
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When talking about method parameters, &$variable refers to a call by reference. So any change you make to this variable remains even if the method is done.

function a($arg) // call by value ($arg is a copy of the original)
{
    $arg += 1;
}
function b(&$arg) // call by reference ($arg IS the original)
{
    $arg += 1;
}

$myArg = 1;

a($myArg);
echo $myArg;

echo "\r\n";

b($myArg);
echo $myArg;

// Displays:
// 1
// 2

Here is the section of the PHP manual about references.

The & after the = basically means the same, but they are useless in this context because you already have a call by reference anyway. You can safely remove them.

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Here's the correct PHP manual entry on references: http://php.net/manual/en/language.references.php

In most cases you don't need to pass a reference using the ampersand & as PHP will always pass a reference first and only create a copy of the variable on the first write access.

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Thank you for the link, what would passing it in as a reference do that byVal (i assume is the other, do a bit of vb.net) cant? –  zomboble Oct 19 '12 at 8:57
    
The VB.NET-equivalent to the & for reference calls is ByRef. ByVal stands for call by value. –  nikeee Oct 19 '12 at 9:01
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It is passing the variable as a reference. Without the ampersand the following code wouldnt work:

$var = "content";

function test(&$v)
{

    $v = "this is new content";

}

test($var);

NOTE: this is untested code, but the theory is close enough. It allows to modify the variable from within a different scope, so rather than passing the value of a variable, in this example - "content", you are passing a reference to the variable itself, so you are directly editing the variable you passed in.

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Its because this function doesnt return anything, just modify, and all.

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