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I was reading JS manual, and found nice trick, that ~val === (val != -1). I found it nice, and want to use it in my C code.

Is it portable? I checked on my GNU/Linux box, it work.

EDIT: Seems I asked not too clearly. Of course, I know, there is no === in C. Question is, are both conditionals

int val;
if (~val) {...}
if (val != -1) {...} 

equal?

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You must mean ~val === (val ^= -1) –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 19 '12 at 9:04
    
what if val is -1 then your sentence is wrong..!! –  Mr.32 Oct 19 '12 at 9:04
    
Use ~val in your code so that wouldn't confuse anybody. –  Andrey Oct 19 '12 at 9:05
    
Or if the right side is correct, then !!~val === (val!=-1) –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 19 '12 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following answer was written for the question as it was originally phrased, which led myself and others to think that he was asking whether ~ans and (ans ^ -1) were equivalent.

This trick is not as portable as ~val because it assumes that -1 == 0b111111111..., which is true only on a two's complement machine (granted, that holds for virtually any machine today). It exploits the fact that the xor operation works as a "controlled inverter", flipping each bit in its left operand for which the corresponding right operand bit is one.

However, substituting ~0 for -1 might work.

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Nice idea. But I think ~0 is not garantied to be negative,right? –  KAction Oct 19 '12 at 9:16
    
Alas, the point is not to make it negative but to generate the bit pattern of all ones, which I believe ~0 will always accomplish. :) –  Martin Törnwall Oct 19 '12 at 9:17
    
It all about functions like indexOf. Also, on what kinds of computers it actually fails? Is integer representation depends on kernel, compiler, hardware? –  KAction Oct 19 '12 at 9:20
    
It depends on the hardware architecture. As far as I know two's complement is used almost universally today. –  Martin Törnwall Oct 19 '12 at 9:21

No, it's not.

First, the operator "===" doesn't exist i C. Secondly, the comparison "val != -1" returns true (1) or false (0) in C.

What is it you want to accomplish?

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He's using "===" to mean equivalency. And he wants to flip all bits in the value binary, which Aki's comment will do. –  WhozCraig Oct 19 '12 at 9:05

val != -1 will either be 1 or 0.

If val = 0,  ~0 = 0xFFFFFFFF on a 32 bit machine with 32 bit integer.
If val = 1,  ~1 = 0xFFFFFFFE on a 32 bit machine with 32 bit integer.

and so on.

HOW in the world would this be equal to 1 or 0? anything but only for two specific values of 'val'?

According to Aki's statement: you probably meant ~val = val ^= -1.

xor truth table:
 --------------------
|A   |   B   |  A^B |
 --------------------
|0   |   0   |  0   | 
 --------------------
|0   |   1   |  1   |
 --------------------
|1   |   0   |  1   |
 --------------------
|1   |   1   |  0   |
 --------------------
example: val = 1:
1(val) is represented as : 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001
-1 is represented as:      1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111
-------------------------------------------------------------------
         (XOR VAL AND -1): 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1110
--------------------------------------------------------------------
[negate:0to1 1to0]  ~val : 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1110
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Since these two are logically equal - and all machines follow logic, this has to work on every machine that stores negative number in 2's complement method.

BTW: 2's complement is 1's complement of a negative number + 1:

hence to store -1:

-1 = negative     :   0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001
1' = 1s compliment:   1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1110
2' = 2s compliemnt:   1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111
---------------------------------------------------------------
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In the context of if (exprA) vs if (exprB),
exprA := ~val,
exprB := val!=-1
they are equal.

In the context of (exprA) and (exprB) evaluating to the same value, the answer is No.

Either
exprA := ~val in which case the equivalent expression is
exprB := val ^ -1, or

exprB := val!=-1, in which case the equivalent expression could be
exprA := !!(~val)

The revised question is different, as (val!=-1) evaluates to either 0 or 1 in numerical values, but if statements can use any non-zero value to represent the condition true.

So the answer depends on the context.

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