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the header file

#ifndef deneme_h
#define deneme_h

#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std ;
class A
{
public:
Course ( int code ) ;
int getACode () ;


 private:

    int code   ;

};


class B
{

  public:
    B ( A * a  = NULL) ;
        A     * getA     () ;

 private:

    A     * a   ;
  friend ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , B & b ) ;
};

#endif

the A.cpp

#include "deneme.h"
using namespace std ;


A :: A ( int code )
{
    this -> code = code;
} 

int A :: getACode()
{
    return this -> code;
}

the B.cpp

#include "deneme.h"

using namespace std ;

B::B ( A     * a ) 
    {
        this -> a = new A(223);
        this -> a = a;

    }
A * A::getA     ()  {   return this -> a;}



ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , B & b ) { out << b.course->getACode();}

and the main.cpp

#include "deneme.h"
using namespace std;

int main(){

Course* c1 = new Course(223) ;

Offering* o1_1 = new  Offering(c1);

cout<< *o1_1;

return 0;
}

Hello everyone

I want to ask about this code. The above code works fine and it prints 223. But when I change the operator overloading part in B.cpp

 ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , Offering & offering ) { out << offering.(getCourse() )->getCourseCode();}

I get an error. Why does it give error? Can't I use a return value. Thanks for answers.

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closed as not a real question by Brian Roach, Luchian Grigore, jogojapan, jv42, Kris Oct 19 '12 at 9:52

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
There is no return out;. –  hmjd Oct 19 '12 at 9:17
    
I don't understand what change should I do? –  user1559792 Oct 19 '12 at 9:18
    
if a function has a return type other than void there must be a return statement that returns an instance of the return type. So add return out; to operator<<(). –  hmjd Oct 19 '12 at 9:20
    
you need to add 'return' keyword before out; –  kuperspb Oct 19 '12 at 9:20
    
I add return thanks but now I get and different error offering.cpp: In function ‘std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, Offering&)’: offering.cpp:18:80: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘(’ token offering.cpp:18:91: error: ‘getCourse’ was not declared in this scope –  user1559792 Oct 19 '12 at 9:21

3 Answers 3

As already said, you need to return out, I think the line you want is :

ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , Offering & offering ) { out << ( offering.getCourse() )->getCourseCode(); return out; }

(I moved a parenthesis)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, thank you! but why offering.(getCourse())->getCourseCode(); this doesn't work despite I add the return out part –  user1559792 Oct 19 '12 at 9:25
    
You want to apply the -> operator on the member so first take the member : offering.getCourse() and then apply the -> operator on the whole statement so : ( offering.getCourse() )-> ... –  gogoprog Oct 19 '12 at 9:27
    
And I want to ask one more question if you have time. I add the 223 number in B.cpp Course* c1 = new Course(223) ; but I don't want to put it there I want to put it in main but when I don't do I get an error. How can I solve this problem? –  user1559792 Oct 19 '12 at 9:30
    
Following code is incorrect, you are overriding this->a value after assignment B::B ( A * a ) { this -> a = new A(223); this -> a = a; } So just do this->a = a and in main : new Offering( new Course(223) ) Is that what you want? –  gogoprog Oct 19 '12 at 9:40

remove the parentheses around getCourse()

share|improve this answer
    
it works when remove the parantheses but why it works? –  user1559792 Oct 19 '12 at 9:27
    
Because the compiler expects a member of the object after operator '.' and not '('. –  icepack Oct 19 '12 at 9:30

When used with iostream:

operator<< should take its second parameter by const reference (or value if that's trivial).

It should return its first parameter.

so

ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , const B & b ) 
{ 
     return out << b.course->getACode();
} 

ostream & operator<< ( ostream & out , const Offering & offering ) 
{ 
    return out << offering.getCourse()->getCourseCode();
} 

You can also put return out as a separate statement after the other statement in both cases.

Note also that in C++ you do not have to create all your objects with new.

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