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function result()
{
    var a, b, c;
    a = 10;
    b = 20;
    c = a+b;
    document.write("The result of a+b is" + c);
}

<input type="button" value="Result" onclick=result();>

I'm new to JavaScript, and I'm learning step by step. I tried above example and it's working fine but after click on button result is not showing on same window.

Should I use innerHTML? But how can I use I don't know. And using innerHTML is good for programing?

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7 Answers 7

document.write ALWAYS starts a new page unless there is one currently being loaded. Once the current page has finished loading any document.write statements will write to the NEXT web page to be displayed, not the current one because that one is already written.

use DOM methods like this one :

<script type="text/javascript">

    function result()
    {
        var a, b, c;
        a = 10;
        b = 20;
        c = a+b;
        document.getElementById('foo').innerHTML = "The result of a+b is" + c;
        return false
    }

</script>
<span id="foo"></span>
<input type="button" value="Result" onclick="return result();">
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Any document.write() must be called before the page finishes to load, otherwise it will open a new page (see this link for help) so maybe that's your problem

you may want to do something like

function result()
{
    var a, b, c;
    a = 10;
    b = 20;
    c = a+b;
    var content = document.getElementById('result_div').innerHTML; 
    content += "The result is ..." ;
}
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If it's for debug purpose, use console.log(value), otherwise, yes, save the value in innerHTML.

console.log("The result of a+b is" + c);
alert("The result of a+b is" + c); // For very old  browsers.

using the innerHTML property:

document.getElementById('{id}').innerHTML = "The result of a+b is" + c;
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Try this code

function result()
{
    var a, b, c;
    a = 10;
    b = 20;
    c = a+b;
    console.log("The result of a+b is" + c);
}
share|improve this answer

This would write the result in a seperate element without overwriting the whole document:

<script type="text/javascript">

    function result()
    {
        var a, b, c;
        a = 10;
        b = 20;
        c = a+b;
        var result = document.getElementById("result");
        result.innerHTML = "The result of a+b is" + c;    
    }

</script>

<input type="button" value="Result" onclick=result();>
​<div id="result"></div>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

see http://jsfiddle.net/AcTM2/

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Change the method result:

function result()
{
var a, b, c;
a = 10;
b = 20;
c = a+b;
document.getElementById('result').innerHTML="The result of a+b is" + c;
}

and then put in the body a div with an id result:

<div id="result"></div>
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try

function result()
{
    var a, b, c;
    a = 10;
    b = 20;
    c = a+b;
    var result = "The result of a+b is" + c;
    document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode(result));
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement("br"));
}

This way, you will not need to create an additional node, to hold the result data.

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If you want to add the text at some other point, not at the end, then create an element in the page & append the value of result to that element's innerHTML. –  anishsane Oct 19 '12 at 10:06

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