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I would like to write a function :

inline char separator()
{
    /* SOMETHING */
}

that returns the file separator of the system in standard C/C++/C++11 ? (I mean slash or backslash depending on the system). Is there a way to achieve this ?

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1  
I know it says "standard C++" but if you don't mind using boost... stackoverflow.com/questions/8384477/… –  ta.speot.is Oct 19 '12 at 9:45
2  
Boost is written in standard C++ so should be acceptable - see especially boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/filesystem/doc/… –  Mark Oct 19 '12 at 9:47
2  
How much does it matter? The Windows APIs all accept both slash and backslash as the separator. cmd.exe is fussy; it uses slash to indicate options and therefore requires backslash in paths. For presentation to users, it is probably better to use backslashes, but with URLs using slashes, people probably aren't as hung up on it as they once were. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 19 '12 at 10:36
2  
@Mark "Boost is written in standard C++ so should be acceptable" - Well, so is Qt, so just use QDir::separator().toAscii(). –  Christian Rau Oct 19 '12 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'm not sure how to do it other than by checking ifdefs

inline char separator()
{
#ifdef _WIN32
    return '\\';
#else
    return '/';
#endif
}

or (as suggested by PaperBirdMaster)

const char kPathSeparator =
#ifdef _WIN32
                            '\\';
#else
                            '/';
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
All windows version define __WIN32 ?? –  Jeyaram Oct 19 '12 at 9:45
    
I believe so - see MSDN or a previous SO answer. Btw, its _WIN32 (single leading _) –  simonc Oct 19 '12 at 9:52
5  
Just a note - Windows supports forward slash (/) as a path separator as well. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Oct 19 '12 at 9:56
1  
Another note: why a inline function and not a const char? –  PaperBirdMaster Oct 19 '12 at 10:04
1  
I was just replying in the style suggested by the OP. You're correct that a const char would be just as good. I'll add that to the answer –  simonc Oct 19 '12 at 10:05

that can be something like this

#if defined(WIN32) || defined(_WIN32) 
#define PATH_SEPARATOR "\\" 
#else 
#define PATH_SEPARATOR "/" 
#endif 
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Linux version of finding OS.

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   #ifdef __unix__
     printf("\n This is linux.... \n");
   #else
     printf("\n This is not linux.... \n");
   #endif
   return 0;
}

Prints This is linux.... on Linux machine.

Edit: One correction. _WIN32 always defined for both 32 and 64 bit Windows OS.

This will give you more idea about detecting Os. Which Cross Platform Preprocessor Defines? (__WIN32__ or __WIN32 or WIN32 )?

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1  
Can you explain why it is better to use __unix__ instead of _WIN32? –  avakar Oct 19 '12 at 10:38
4  
@avakar Maybe in order to fail on Mac? ;) –  Christian Rau Oct 19 '12 at 10:41
    
_WIN32 confuses that it is defined only in 32 bit Windows OS. But not in reality. –  Jeyaram Oct 19 '12 at 11:04
4  
-1. Windows and linux are not the only games in town. There's also Mac, Solaris, AIX, and others. Plus there is no singular thing as 'linux'. There's a whole zoo of different OSs that call themselves linux that are not compatible with one another. It's windows that is singularly distinct with its backslash as a file separator, so the test should be for windows. –  David Hammen Oct 19 '12 at 11:27
    
Ah, looking at the revision history, the original reason for not choosing _WIN32 was indeed the one totally invalidated by your own edit. –  Christian Rau Oct 19 '12 at 13:15

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