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As I dig deeper into the concepts of knockout.js, I'm having difficulties to understand why I can't tell a ko.observable how to parse/write its value like so:

   dateValue = ko.observable({
        read: function (dateString) {
            /*convert a date string to an object here for internal storage*/
            return Globalize.parseDate(dateString, 'd');
        },
        write: function (dateObj) {
             /*format a date object for output*/
            return Globalize.formatDate(dateObj, 'd');
        }
    })

I'm aware that ko.computed's exist for this purpose, but they still require me to keep a "shadow" observable where the result of read() needs to be written to.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Write an extender to add a formatted computed observable so you may read or write formatted values while still giving you access to the "raw" unformatted value.

ko.extenders['date'] = function (target, format) {
    var formatted = ko.computed({
        'read': function () {
            return Globalize.parseDate(target(), format);
        },
        'write': function (date) {
            target(Globalize.format(date, format));
        }
    });
    target.formatted = formatted;
    return target;
};

dateValue = ko.observable('10/19/2012').extend({ 'date': 'd' });

// e.g.,
dateValue();           // 10/19/2012
dateValue.formatted(); // Fri Oct 19 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (Pacific Daylight Time)

dateValue.formatted(new Date(2012, 9, 31));

dateValue();           // 10/31/2012
dateValue.formatted(); // Wed Oct 31 2012 00:00:00 GMT-0700 (Pacific Daylight Time)
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You need to use a ko.computed instead of ko.observable. See below. Observables generally contain only values or other observables. Computed is intended for doing calculations

   dateValue = ko.computed({
        read: function () {
            /*convert a date string to an object here for internal storage*/
            return Globalize.parseDate(this, 'd');
        },
        write: function (dateObj) {
             /*format a date object for output*/
            return Globalize.formatDate(dateObj, 'd');
        },
        owner: viewmodel.dateObservable
    })
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This example will not work. The return value of a computed's write function isn't used. –  Michael Best Oct 19 '12 at 22:42
    
Oops. You are correct. –  photo_tom Oct 19 '12 at 23:00

After some research I found that extenders do exactly what I want, they can e.g. auto-convert values on observables as soon as they are set.

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I'm curious how you can do this with an extender. Please provide an example. –  Michael Best Oct 19 '12 at 22:45

You could write it this way without an extender:

// dateValue() is the raw date object
// dateValue.formatted() will return the formatted date as well 
// as parse a date string and save it back to the observable
dateValue = ko.observable();
dateValue.formatted = ko.computed({
    read: function () {
        /*format a date object for output*/
        return Globalize.formatDate(dateValue(), 'd')
    },
    write: function (dateObj) {
        /*convert a date string to an object here for internal storage*/
        dateValue(Globalize.parseDate(dateObj, 'd'));
    }
});
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This example is seriously wrong. dateValue is the computed, so both your read and write functions would be recursive. Knockout will prevent recursion on the read function, but not on the write. –  Michael Best Oct 19 '12 at 22:45
    
You're right. I didn't spend much time thinking about it. I've edited my answer to actually do what I'd originally intended... –  Michael Berkompas Oct 22 '12 at 16:24

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