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Will guy that execute this in US see the same number with the guy doing this in US if they both do it at the same time?

The documentation says it's the time starting at 1 January 2001 GMT. That means it's from the time GreenWitch reach 1 January.

However, each people would see a different clock. So that means it's localized.

So it's ambiguous. Which one is right?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

NSDate does not store time zone information. It is always relative to GMT/UTC time, which means both the people you describe will get back the same result.

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No, according to the doc:

timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate

Return Value The interval between the system’s absolute reference date (the first instant of 1 January 2001, GMT) and the current date and time.

The current date is dependent of the local time (+ (id)date). So if a guy in China hit a button same time as a guy in Germany, interval will be different ~6 hours. But to their point of view, if they hit the button at say 1pm local, the interval for both will be the same.

Edit:

Actually i was wrong, as Martin pointed out:

A NSDate represents a point in time and knows nothing about time zones. If you display the value of a NSDate with NSLog(@"%@", [NSDate date]) then the date is converted to a string using GMT for display.

So to respond to your question: YES, it will be the same.

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Okay, one guy says it depends on where you are. The other guy says that no it doesn't depend on current time. NSLog of [NSDate date] shows GMT time by the way. –  Anonymous White Oct 19 '12 at 10:43
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It is just the other way around: The current date, i.e. the result of [NSDate date] is not dependent on the local timezone. - If two people execute [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate] at the same moment, the result will be identical. If a Chinese guy executes it a 1pm local time, and a German guy executes it at 1pm local time, the result will be different. –  Martin R Oct 19 '12 at 11:27
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Ha, NSDate really show GMT time? Because i'm actually living on GMT time (i live in French country), So maybe i do wrong assertion. I thought NSDate give you your actual clock time... mmm this is actually interesting. But the doc say + date Creates and returns a new date set to the current date and time. So if NSDate date is GMT based, your response to your question is yeah, but if NSDate date is not GMT, so it's clearly not. –  Mr Bonjour Oct 19 '12 at 12:10
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@MrBonjour: A NSDate represents a point in time and knows nothing about time zones. If you display the value of a NSDate with NSLog(@"%@", [NSDate date]) then the date is converted to a string using GMT for display. –  Martin R Oct 19 '12 at 14:22
    
Yeah, sorry for misleading you, i have edited my response –  Mr Bonjour Oct 19 '12 at 14:46
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