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I've come to a pattern when writing enums in C++. It is like this:

class Player
{
public:
    class State
    {
    public:
        typedef enum
        {
            Stopped, 
            Playing, 
            Paused
        }PossibleValues;  

        static const int Count() {return Paused+1;};
        static const PossibleValues Default() {return Stopped;};
    };

    //...
}

This solves a some of the usual issues with enums, like pollution of outside namespaces, etc. But there is still a thing I don't like: The Count() is done manually. There are only two ways I know how to do it: this one is calculated from Last+1; or write plain hardcoded.

Question is: Is there some way, like using preprocessor macros, that automatically gets the count, to put it after in the Count() method? Attention: I don't want to have a last fake element called Count inside the enum, polluting it!

Thanks in advance!

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5  
You don't need to typedef enums in C++. Just say enum PossibleValues { ... }. –  detunized Oct 19 '12 at 10:30
1  
Isn't it a good idea to suggest that the C++14 guys should take this issue into consideration? –  sergiol Nov 13 '13 at 11:02

5 Answers 5

No there isn't, and if you need this, you probably shouldn't be using an enum in the first place.

In your particular case, what's a use case where you'd ever want to call Count?

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1  
Really, in standard C++ it's unavailable. You can use macros wrapper to create and define enums (i've seen one of implementation on codeproject.com) but it looking discouraged. Any other method have pitfalls. –  Torsten Oct 19 '12 at 11:27
    
In this particular case, there is not much use of the Count() method, but I can assure you there are LOTS of cases of enumerations where I wrote code like this and I make use of the Count() function. –  sergiol Nov 27 '13 at 14:13
    
@sergiol hard coded value at the end, or if the values start from 0 and are consecutive, just add as the last one PossibleValues_COUNT. (in the year it's been since this answer, I too have encountered situations like this, but I still think better alternatives exist) –  Luchian Grigore Nov 27 '13 at 15:36
    
@LuchianGrigore: What alternatives do you know? –  sergiol Nov 27 '13 at 17:24
    
@LuchianGrigore: Enum is after all short for enumeration.. What if you want to do an enumeration of all the elements in your enum and you don't want to explicitly reference the last item (Paused in this case) because experience has taught you that the enum may grow in the future and you will have a bug.. –  Andreas Magnusson Mar 23 at 9:37

AFAIK there's no automatic compiler-supported keyword to get the total amount of elements in enum. OTOH this usually doesn't make sense: you may have multiple values with the same value, as long as the values don't have to have consequent values (i.e. you may assign the values manually, rather than rely on automatic numbering).

One common practice is to declare the enum in the following way:

  typedef enum
    {
        Stopped, 
        Playing, 
        Paused,

        count

    }PossibleValues;  

This way, if count is always defined last - it will give you the count of the enum elements, assuming the numbering starts from 0 and is consequent.

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2  
" Attention: I don't want to have a last fake element called Count inside the enum, polluting it!" –  Luchian Grigore Oct 19 '12 at 10:31
    
This is a gross hack. –  John Dibling Oct 19 '12 at 11:01
1  
@JohnDibling don't think it is so gross see here –  user1810087 Sep 27 '13 at 13:37

Must the type of PossibleValues be an enum? If you just need something that behaves like an enum, you can do the following:

#include <iostream>

#include <functional>
#include <set>


template <typename Representation, typename T>
class Iterable_Strong_Enum
{
private:
  struct T_Ptr_Less : public std::binary_function<T const *, T const *, bool>
  {
    bool operator()(T const * x, T const * y) const
    {
      return x->get_representation() < y->get_representation();
    }
  };

public:
  typedef std::set<T const *, T_Ptr_Less> instances_list;
  typedef typename instances_list::const_iterator const_iterator;

  Representation const & get_representation() const { return _value; }

  static Representation const & min() { return (*_instances.begin())->_value; }

  static Representation const & max() { return (*_instances.rbegin())->_value; }

  static T const * corresponding_enum(Representation const & value)
  {
    const_iterator it = std::find_if(_instances.begin(), _instances.end(), [&](T const * e) -> bool
    {
      return e->get_representation() == value;
    });
    if (it != _instances.end())
    {
      return *it;
    }
    else
    {
      return nullptr;
    }
  }

  bool operator==(T const & other) const { return _value == other._value; }
  bool operator!=(T const & other) const { return _value != other._value; }
  bool operator< (T const & other) const { return _value <  other._value; }
  bool operator<=(T const & other) const { return _value <= other._value; }
  bool operator> (T const & other) const { return _value >  other._value; }
  bool operator>=(T const & other) const { return _value >= other._value; }

  static bool is_valid_value(Representation const & value) { return corresponding_enum(value) != nullptr; }

  static typename instances_list::size_type size() { return _instances.size(); }

  static const_iterator begin() { return _instances.begin(); }

  static const_iterator end() { return _instances.end(); }

protected:
  explicit Iterable_Strong_Enum(Representation const & value);

private:
  Representation _value;

  static instances_list _instances;
};

template <typename Representation, typename T>
Iterable_Strong_Enum<Representation, T>::Iterable_Strong_Enum(Representation const & value)
: _value(value)
{
  _instances.insert(static_cast<T const *>(this));
}

class PossibleValues : public Iterable_Strong_Enum<int, PossibleValues>
{
public:
  static const PossibleValues Stopped;
  static const PossibleValues Playing;
  static const PossibleValues Pause;
protected:
private:
  explicit PossibleValues(int value);
};

PossibleValues::PossibleValues(int value) : Iterable_Strong_Enum<int, PossibleValues>(value) { }

// you need to call that explicitly
Iterable_Strong_Enum<int, PossibleValues>::instances_list Iterable_Strong_Enum<int, PossibleValues>::_instances;

const PossibleValues PossibleValues::Stopped(0);
const PossibleValues PossibleValues::Playing(1);
const PossibleValues PossibleValues::Pause(2);

void stackoverflow()
{
  std::cout << "There are " << PossibleValues::size() << " different possible values with representation: " << std::endl;
  for (auto pv = PossibleValues::begin(); pv != PossibleValues::end(); ++pv)
  {
    PossibleValues possible_value = **pv;
    std::cout << possible_value.get_representation() << std::endl;
  }
}

I'm kinda torn about that solution. On the one hand, its pretty general and on the other hand its a big hammer for a small problem.

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Reposting an answer from a similar question (What is the best way for non sequencial integer c++ enums) because it was kind of relevant to an otherwise pretty much unanswered question.

A pattern you could use to get what you want is to use an std::initializer_list to store all the values of your enum.

namespace PossibleValues
{
    enum Type
    {
        ZERO= 0,
        PLUS180= 180,
        PLUS90= 90,
        MINUS90= -90
    };

    constexpr auto Values = {ZERO, PLUS180, PLUS90, MINUS90};
    size_t Count() { return Values.size(); }
    Type Default() { return *begin(Values); }
}

This also has the benefit of being able to iterate of the values of the enum even if they don't have linear values.

And I think you could possibly generate both the enum, the initializer list and the functions from a single macro with a variadic macro, though in the best of worlds this kind of thing should be in the standard.

Edit: When I used PossibleValues as an enum or used a struct for PossibleValues, my compiler would complain about incomplete type. Using a namespace for an enum is a bit unusual, but it works fine.

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I believe this example is self-explanatory, just use predefined macro __LINE__ for counting lines occupied by your enum - if every value is on one line - then it should work:

class Player
{
public:
    class State
    {
    public:
    private: 
        static const int PossibleValues_Begin = __LINE__ + 4; 
    public:
        typedef enum
        {
            Stopped, // this line must be pointed by PossibleValues_Begin 
            Playing, 
            Paused
        }PossibleValues;  //
        static const int PossibleValues_Count = __LINE__ - PossibleValues_Begin; 

        static const int Count() {return PossibleValues_Count; };
        static const PossibleValues Default() {return Stopped;};
    };

    //...
};

However - do it only with great care.

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4  
This is a bad idea –  Dani Oct 19 '12 at 17:56
1  
@Dani but it works. I agree it is not ideal. It should be used with great care. But what you propose for enum containing 100+ elements, and especially for enum containing values which are not in natural (0,1,2,3,...) order? Be honest and tell wouldn't you subtract start/end lines with such 100+ enum? Other thing is the necessity of such enums - but this is out of this subject. –  PiotrNycz Oct 19 '12 at 20:38

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