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I created a new bean called client with Id, Name, LastName and Address fields. I created the model and the view of course. My model returns a list of all the clients. And this one is working fine.

But I need a model where I can select only one specific client filtered by Id. Can anybody tell me what I need to change (besides the SQL statement) inside this model so I get only one client according to filter (id) criteria from SQL?

{
    Connection connection = getDatabaseConnection();
    request.setAttribute("clientList", getClientList(connection));
    closeDatabaseConnection(connection);
}

private ArrayList<Client> getClientList(Connection con)
{
    String sqlstr = "SELECT * FROM Clients";
    PreparedStatement stmt = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;
    ArrayList<Client> clients = new ArrayList<Client>();

    try
    {
        stmt = con.prepareStatement(sqlStr);
        rs = stmt.executeQuery();

        while (rs.next())
        {
            Client client = new Client();
            client.setId(rs.getInt("Id"));
            client.setName(rs.getString("Name"));
            client.setLastName(rs.getString("LastName"));
            client.setAddress(rs.getString("Address"));

            clients.add(client);
        }

        rs.close();
        stmt.close();
    }
    catch (SQLException sqle)
    {
        sqle.printStackTrace();
    }
    finally
    {
        return clients;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, I guess you already have a class with a method that you invoke to retrieve all the cliets, right?

Well, now add another method, but this time a method that receives the client Id as parameter:

public List<Client> getAllClients();
public Client getClientById(int clientId);

You will need a secondary SQL statement, since the logic in the first one is for retrieving all records. Something like:

"select clientId, clientName, ... from clients where clientId=?"

Using a JDBC PreparedStatement you can easily replace the ? for the actual parameter being received by your API.

You can also consider abstracting your mapping strategy so that you can use it for both methods:

class ClientMapper implements SqlMapper<Client> {
    @Override
    public Client map(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
       Client client = new Client();
       client.setId(rs.getInt("Id"));
       client.setName(rs.getString("Name"));
       client.setLastName(rs.getString("LastName"));
       client.setAddress(rs.getString("Address"));
       return client;
    }
}

You can also have a ClientsMapper that uses this single client mapper to retrieve all clients.

class ClientsMapper implements SqlMapper<List<Client>>{
   @Override
   public List<Client> map(ResultSet rs){
     List<Client> result = new ArrayList<>();
     ClientMapper mapper = new ClientMapper();
     while(rs.next()){
        result.add(mapper.map(rs));
     }
     return result;
   }
}
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For the first question answer is yes. The idea with second method is not bad option actually. I think I am starting to follow You :) Basically, can You tell me what modification I should do in my code above to get just one client filtered by id. This method sets all clients in the database. What would look like method that sets values for only one client. –  Salzburger Oct 19 '12 at 11:14
    
I'd wrap rs.next() inside an if, else this may throw a nice SQLException on resultset get calls when it didn't return any record (i.e. when the given ID doesn't exist in the DB). –  BalusC Oct 19 '12 at 11:15
    
Thanks for tip! –  Salzburger Oct 19 '12 at 11:17
    
@BalusC I was assuming you would not invoke the mapper unless there are results in the resultset. It's better not to go down that hole, because if you check that here, you would be forced to return null objects, which is always a bad idea. –  Edwin Dalorzo Oct 19 '12 at 11:18
    
Why are you calling rs.next() in the mapper then? Just do if (rs.next()) { client = map(rs); }. This way it's also better reuseable for multiple results, while (rs.next()) { clients.add(map(rs)); }. –  BalusC Oct 19 '12 at 11:19

What do you mean by besides sql statement?You will have to add a where clause to the query.I don't think it's possible any other case.

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Thats what I thoughr by saying besides sql statement. –  Salzburger Oct 19 '12 at 11:11
    
yes, there's no such a way using PreparedStatement or Statement. However, you it is surely possible in some ORM frameworks. For example, it is possible in Hibernate with the help of Criteria and Restrictions APIs. –  Sumit Desai Oct 19 '12 at 11:14

well you can have one more method that returns a single client based on the id you provide as argument.

 public Client getClientById(int id){
    //fetch the client data using the id

    //make a local Client object
    Client c = new Client();

    //populate c based on the values you get from your database.

    //return this local object of Client
    return c;

 }
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I think I got it now. Thanks –  Salzburger Oct 19 '12 at 11:22

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