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A Transpose/Unzip Function in Python

I have a list of tuples, where I want to unzip this list into two independent lists. I'm looking for some standardized operation in Python.

>>> l = [(1,2), (3,4), (8,9)]
>>> f_xxx (l)
[ [1, 3, 8], [2, 4, 9] ] 

I'm looking for a succinct and pythonic way to achieve this.

Basically, I'm hunting for inverse operation of zip() function.

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marked as duplicate by senderle, Martijn Pieters, Vatine, Mark, Andy Hayden Oct 23 '12 at 15:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
zip is basically it's own inverse. It's pretty cute like that. :) –  mgilson Oct 19 '12 at 12:45
1  
@mgilson I got it. it's beautiful how a function is its own inverse. –  VaidAbhishek Oct 21 '12 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

If you want a list of lists:

>>> [list(t) for t in zip(*l)]
[[1, 3, 8], [2, 4, 9]]

If a list of tuples is OK:

>>> zip(*l)
[(1, 3, 8), (2, 4, 9)]
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4  
I think map(list, zip(*l)) is quite nice in Python 2.x. Anyway, +1 for option of list of lists :) –  Jon Clements Oct 19 '12 at 12:45
1  
I prefer list comprehension above map :) –  user647772 Oct 19 '12 at 12:46
    
map is slower than a LC. –  dav1d Oct 19 '12 at 12:48
4  
@dav1d -- That's not true. The speed of map vs. list-comp is entirely problem dependent (You'll see different timings from different people for different problems on SO relatively frequently). map + lambda is usually slower though ... The nice thing about a list-comp is that it's the same in py2k and py3k. –  mgilson Oct 19 '12 at 12:49
1  
@dav1d -- Here's an older, but classic post which shows the opposite (and the results still hold for me using python2.7 on OS-X) –  mgilson Oct 19 '12 at 12:52

Use zip(*list):

>>> l = [(1,2), (3,4), (8,9)]
>>> zip(*l)
[(1, 3, 8), (2, 4, 9)]
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