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Example

abstract class Foobar
{

  abstract void myAbstractMethod();

  public void myConcreteMethod()
  {
      //busy code begin
      myAbstractMethod();
      // busy code complete
  }

class childClass extends FooBar
{

  @Override
  public myAbstractMethod()
  {
   //busy code to make abstract method, concrete
  }

}

Is this acceptable? Is this the correct approach? Is this poor design?

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Yes, for sure, have you tried? –  Aubin Oct 19 '12 at 13:00
    
Yes I tried it, it works. I just didnt know if this approach is frowned upon/terrible design –  stackoverflow Oct 19 '12 at 13:00
    
Why wouldn't it be acceptable? –  Mark Rotteveel Oct 19 '12 at 13:01
2  
Yes, this is the template method pattern: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template_method_pattern –  Jon Skeet Oct 19 '12 at 13:01
2  
This is actually a part of the template method design pattern so it is definitely not frowned upon. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 19 '12 at 13:01
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10 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Totally acceptable. For example, you can't use the template method design pattern any other way..

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1  
Or the factory method pattern. –  bot Oct 19 '12 at 13:03
    
@bot Very true... –  ppeterka Oct 19 '12 at 13:05
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Yes, you're using abstract classes correctly.

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Yes, this makes sense and would be acceptable.

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It is both legal and useful for an abstract class to call its own method.

This is one way for subclasses to extend the behavior of the abstract class.

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You're using it as it should be used - the whole point of abstraction is that the class knows the method is there :)

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Absolutely, that is one of the main benefits of abstract methods: You have an larger process provided in the abstract class, but are deferring a part of it to the subclasses. You call the abstract method to allow the subclass to fill in its contribution.

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Yes. This is very much true. It indicates that you are delegating the responsibility of implementation of abstract methods to the consumer or you can say client and you are still using the method.

Event Listeners are implemented in this way only, when we don't know the implementation but still calling the method assuming that the client will handle the event in their own way.

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Yes and this is how template method design pattern works which lets certain steps of the algorithm to be overriden by subclasses to allow different behaviours on different subclasses.

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YES.

for example, you want a method first do some common work, then continue with sub-type (sub-class) specific work.

abstract class xxx{
public void work(){
  common1();
  common2();
  specific();
}

abstract void specific();

}
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This is possible and I think this is good approach. For instance, an abstract class Stone may have the implemented method getMass() where it calls its own abstract method computeVolume(). computeVolume() would be different for the cube or for the round stone.

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