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init method is declared in NSObject class hence, the client code can create a new instance of my singleton class, is there any way to achieve the real singleton such that client cannot create a new instance.

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4  
stackoverflow.com/questions/7274360/… maybe duplicate question –  brianLikeApple Oct 19 '12 at 13:06
    
You should look at Peter Hosey's blog post on this topic. His implementation is a "true" singleton. –  Josh Caswell Oct 19 '12 at 18:58
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4 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

init method is for initialization of instance variables. on its own will not create the object. Alloc, copy methods needs to be overridden to achieve a real single ton.

Hope this should clarify.

+ (id)alloc {
    NSLog(@"%@: use +sharedInstance instead of +alloc", [[self class] name]);
  return nil; 
}
+ (id)new {
 return [self alloc];
}

+ (SingletonClass *)sharedInstance {
static SingletonClass *myInstance = nil; 
 if (!myInstance)
 {
    myInstance = [[super alloc] init];
 }
 return myInstance; 
}
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I still cannot hide the alloc method from the client code as it is declared in NSObject. –  user1446500 Oct 19 '12 at 13:14
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Just do this:

 static SingletonClass  *singleton;

+ (SingletonClass *)sharedInstance 
 {
     @synchronized(self) { //For thread safety
         if (singleton == nil) {
           [[self alloc] init];
         }
         return singleton;
      }
 }


  -(id)init
   {
      if (singleton) { //This way init will always return the same instance
         return singleton;
       }
       self = [super init];
       if (self) {
           singleton = self; 
       }
       return singleton;

   }
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You're going to leak an instance if a client does [[SingletonClass alloc] init]. You need to throw away the self instance that's passed in to init before you return singleton, or override allocWithZone: to return the shared instance, so that it's the one which is passed in to init. –  Josh Caswell Oct 19 '12 at 18:54
    
Are you sure this will leak with arc? I was under the impression the autorelease pool will ditch it. –  Jack Freeman Oct 19 '12 at 20:33
    
If self ever goes into an autorelease pool, then ARC needs some serious work. –  Josh Caswell Oct 20 '12 at 7:27
    
I just made a quick sample project and it does in fact get released. So you are incorrect, ARC does take care of it, there is no leak here. –  Jack Freeman Oct 20 '12 at 17:24
    
That is interesting. Would you throw your test code on pastebin or somewhere? –  Josh Caswell Oct 20 '12 at 18:48
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This is a proper way to do a singleton in objective c

+ (id)sharedManager
{
    static dispatch_once_t onceQueue;
    static SingletonObjectClass *singleton = nil;

    dispatch_once(&onceQueue, ^{
        singleton = [[self alloc] init];
    });

    return singleton;
}

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
       //.....
    }
   return self;
}
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By itself, this doesn't restrict creation to only one instance. A client can still alloc another. –  Josh Caswell Oct 19 '12 at 18:52
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You can return a static object of the class each time, making it a singleton.

@implementation Singleton
@synthesize testVar;

+ (Singleton*) sharedObject {
    static Singleton * myInstance = nil;
    if (myInstance == nil) {
        myInstance = [[[self class] alloc] init];
        testVar = 5;
        // Set default values if needed
    return myInstance;
}

To access object and its members:

[[Singleton sharedObject] testVar]
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