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So I write out an array of Car objects to a file. Then I when I try and read them back in the cars variable gets set on the statement cars = (Car[])in.readObject();. However when I step through it with the debugger the cars variable get 'unset' once I exit the try-catch block.

Car[] cars;
try {
    ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(new FileInputStream(filename)));
    cars = (Car[])in.readObject();
    in.close();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

If on the other hand I initialize the cars variable, for example to an empty array, the cars variable remains set after the try-catch block.

Car[] cars = new Car[0];
try {
    ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(new FileInputStream(filename)));
    cars = (Car[])in.readObject();
    in.close();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

So why is the cars variable retaining the reference to the Car[] that I read in with in.readObject only if I initialize it beforehand? I can't see why it should make any difference whether I initialize cars or not...either way it gets a reference to read in Car[] object in the try-catch block.

It seems like some of lazy-initialization is happening..that the virtual machine is only declaring space for the cars object in the try catch-block and hence it falls out of scope when it exits the block...

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It won't get "unset" - but you won't be able to read the value of cars in code after the try/catch block in the first example, because it's not definitely assigned. (You'll get a compile-time error if you try to.) If an exception is thrown in either of the first two statements of the try block, no value will have been assigned to it.

You can fix this by not just catching exceptions blindly and continuing after printing the stack trace though:

  • Catch only specific exceptions you're interested in. catch (Exception e) is almost always a bad idea
  • You don't need to catch anything, necessarily - can your method actually handle the exception? If not, just declare that it might be thrown. You can always catch and rethrow it.
  • If you can really handle it, maybe you should actually assign a default value in the catch block

If you follow these bullet points (either rethrowing, letting it bubble up, or assigning an appropriate value) then the variable will be definitely assigned, and all will be well.

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I'm not using catch (Exception e), that was just to make the example clearer, in reality I have three properly defined exceptions. I've edited in the actual Exceptions I am using. –  dukenukem Oct 19 '12 at 13:21
    
Ah, I see that if I initialize it to null outside the try-catch block the cars variable gets created and is set to null. If I don't set it to anything it doesn't get created at all until it gets data assigned to it in the try-catch block. I was under the impression that it would be created and set to null by default when I declared it which turns out not to be the case. –  dukenukem Oct 19 '12 at 13:31
    
@dukenukem: It's not that it "doesn't get created" - it's that it's not definitely assigned. Only fields have default values - local variables don't. –  Jon Skeet Oct 19 '12 at 13:34

I will try to explain it with an example. The code below is not compilable:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    String something;
    try {
        something = "123"; 
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }
    System.out.println(something);
}

On the other hand the next snippet is compilable. But the debugger will not show you the value of something outside of the try block since referring it will not be legal if not initialized (the compile error above).

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    String something;
    try {
        something = "123"; 
    } catch (Exception e) {

    }

    String somethingelse ="456";
    System.out.println(somethingelse);
}
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In first case you have to get an compile time error Object not initialized.

Here is what happens when you Create an array in Java.

String[] suits = { "Clubs", "Diamonds", "Hearts", "Spades" };

enter image description here

This is true for all arrays of objects. Now in your case you have created cars which you will refer to array, which you are doing in your try catch block.

Source Link

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It seems in java that if you declare String[] suits; You don't get a block for suits that contains null as I thought was the default behavior. It seems no space is reserved for the suits variable itself unless you explicitly initialize it to something. –  dukenukem Oct 19 '12 at 13:34
    
@dukenukem ya right but if you write String[] suits=new String[10] you will get block of 10 suits that contains null. –  Amandeep Jiddewar Oct 19 '12 at 14:23

The variable can legally get "unset" at runtime as soon as a point in code is reached that is beyond the last usage of the var. This kind of optimization is done routinely by HotSpot and sometimes it can save huge amounts of memory, even prevent OutOfMemoryError. However, this will probably not happen in a debugging session.

At compile time, a static analyzer can determine that the scope of your var can be narrowed down to only inside the try block and compile as if the var was actually declared inside the try. This would explain exactly why you see different behavior between your two code samples: in the second example the narrowing-down is not possible because you assign in the outer scope.

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as Jon Skeet said . (You'll get a compile-time error if you try to.) –  Bhavik Shah Oct 19 '12 at 13:15
    
I have stepped through it with the debugger. In the first code segment I pasted above cars does get set inside the try-catch block. But it most definitely is unset after it as it doesn't appear on the Eclipse Variable window until it gets set in the try-catch block..it gets set to an array of 5 car objects...and then once the code exits the block the cars variable disappears from the Variable window. –  dukenukem Oct 19 '12 at 13:26

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