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OK, what am I missing here? MSDN says the following with regard to DateTimeSerializationMode:

In versions 2.0 and later of the .Net Framework, with this property set to RoundtripDateTime objects are examined to determine whether they are in the local, UTC or an unspecified time zone, and are serialized in such a way that this information is preserved. This is the default behavior and is recommended for all new applications that do not communicate with older versions of the framework.

However:

namespace ConsoleApplication1 {
    public class DateSerTest {
        [XmlElement(DataType = "date")]
        public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    }

    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            DateSerTest d = new DateSerTest { 
                Date = DateTime.SpecifyKind(new DateTime(2009,8,18), DateTimeKind.Utc),
            };
            XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(DateSerTest));
            using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("out.xml", FileMode.Create)) {
                ser.Serialize(fs, d);
            }

            // out.xml will contain:
            // <Date>2009-08-18</Date>

            using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("out.xml", FileMode.Open)) {
                DateSerTest d1 = (DateSerTest) ser.Deserialize(fs);
                Console.WriteLine(d1.Date); // yields: 8/18/2009 12:00:00 AM
                Console.WriteLine(d1.Date.Kind); // yields: Unspecified
            }

            // in.xml:
            // <DateSerTest>
            //     <Date>2009-08-18Z</Date>
            // </DateSerTest>

            using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("in.xml", FileMode.Open)) {
                DateSerTest d1 = (DateSerTest) ser.Deserialize(fs);
                Console.WriteLine(d1.Date); // yields: 8/17/2009 8:00:00 PM
                Console.WriteLine(d1.Date.Kind); // yields: Local
                using (FileStream fs1 = new FileStream("out2.xml", FileMode.Create)) {
                    ser.Serialize(fs1, d1);

                    // out2.xml will contain:
                    // <Date>2009-08-17</Date>
                }
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

So for XSD elements defined as "date" rather than "dateTime", the date is not serialized as UTC. This is a problem, because if I deserialize this XML the resulting date will be of Kind Unspecified, and any conversion to UTC (which should in fact be a no-op because the UTC-ness of the date should have been preserved during the roundtrip), will change at least the time of day, with a 50% chance of making the date yesterday, depending on whether you're east or west of Greenwich.

Shouldn't the date get written as:

  <Date>2009-08-18Z</Date>

?

Indeed, if I deserialize a document that contains the above, I get a DateTime that's already been converted to Local time (I'm in New York so that's Aug 17th 20:00), and if I immediately serialize that object back to XML, I get:

  <Date>2009-08-17</Date>

So, UTC was converted to Local on the way in, and the time part of that Local dropped on the way out, which will make it Unspecified on the way back in again. We've lost all knowledge of the original UTC date specification of August 18th.

Here's what the W3C says about xsd:date:

[Definition:] The ·value space· of date consists of top-open intervals of exactly one day in length on the timelines of dateTime, beginning on the beginning moment of each day (in each timezone), i.e. '00:00:00', up to but not including '24:00:00' (which is identical with '00:00:00' of the next day). For nontimezoned values, the top-open intervals disjointly cover the nontimezoned timeline, one per day. For timezoned values, the intervals begin at every minute and therefore overlap.

The fundamental problem is that if I do the following:

  1. Construct (or otherwise receive) a UTC DateTime value.
  2. Serialize to XML with a schema defining that field as xsd:date
  3. Deserialize that XML back to a DateTime.
  4. Convert the DateTime to UTC (which should have no effect since the "roundtrip" should have preserved this).

Or the following:

  1. Deserialize an XML document containing a UTC xsd:date object (eg. 2009-08-18Z).
  2. Serialize it back to a new XML document without touching it.

Either of these procedures should get me the same date I put in.

Workaround

The only way I can see so far to get the roundtrip behaviour I expect is to implement the Date property as follows, on the assumption that all xsd:date elements represent UTC:

[XmlElement(DataType = "date")]
public DateTime Date {
    get { return _dt; }
    set { _dt = value.Kind == DateTimeKind.Unspecified ? 
                    DateTime.SpecifyKind(value, DateTimeKind.Utc) : 
                    value.ToUniversalTime(); }
}
share|improve this question
    
Small thing: The XML Serializer doesn't use [Serializable]. –  John Saunders Aug 19 '09 at 7:52
    
Ok, well with your modification, I no longer see the question. What's the question? –  Cheeso Aug 19 '09 at 15:12
    
I'm still trying to get my head around it, but I guess my question at this point is: Am I right to conclude that XML roundtrip serialization between DateTime and xsd:date is broken? –  Wayne Aug 19 '09 at 15:51
    
It still doesn't seem broken to me, though I understand it doesn't behave the way you would like it to behave. But you seem to have a pretty easy workaround. –  Cheeso Aug 19 '09 at 17:05
    
I can't think of a situation where the default behaviour would be useful or desired. And in my situation (classes generated from the FpML standard) it's a hard slog to apply this workaround to every date in the spec... –  Wayne Aug 19 '09 at 17:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I opened a Connect issue and got this back from Microsoft, confirming my fears:

We have different behaviors for handling Date, Time and DateTime values. For DateTime values, if XmlDateTimeSerializationMode is not Local the information about the kind (UTC, Local or Unspecified) is preserved. This is also true while deserializing. However, for Date and Time, they are always serialized out with the same format: (yyyy-MM-dd for Date and HH:mm:ss.fffffff.zzzzzz for Time). So the information about kind is lost on serializing and deserializing. We are opening a documentation bug on our side in order to improve the documentation about this.

share|improve this answer
    
anyone know if this was ever resolved? –  Lucas B Dec 10 '09 at 19:50
1  
Depends what you mean by 'resolved'... Microsoft's statement indicates to me that the API doesn't do the right thing, but they'll 'resolve' it by documenting the anomaly. –  Wayne Dec 10 '09 at 22:24
    
So can you just specify the property be serialized as DateTime to solve the problem then? –  xr280xr Aug 2 '13 at 18:06
    
If you control the schema, I suppose so. We were dealing with this issue with respect to the FpML standard, which (correctly) uses xsd:date for financial dates that require no time component. –  Wayne Aug 3 '13 at 15:44

I don't see the problem you described.

Your sample code doesn't deserialize. I added some code to deserialize, and it roundtrips as I would expect. I did not see the date move back a day, or forward a day.

I did notice that the time portion of the d.Date field is stripped for serialization, regardless of the DateTimeKind. This seems correct to me. It doesn't make sense to me, intuitively, to either serialize a timezone with a "Date", or to convert to UTC. It would be surprising to me that if I had a Date value of 8-18-2009, and when serialized, it showed up as 8-19-2009Z. So I think the way it works now seems correct.

  • DateTime's that are serialized as xsd:dateTime include zone info.
  • DateTimes serialized as xsd:date, do not. I would also expect that with [XmlElement(DateType="time")] (xsd:time), the timezone would not be included. I didn't test this.

So the problem as I see it is, this behavior, which makes sense to me, isn't documented clearly, especially with the changes introduced for roundtripping. The fact that DataType="date" and DataType="time" do not convert to UTC for serialization, should be clearly stated.

you wrote:

and any conversion to UTC will change at least the time of day,

But I didn't see this at all. When I convert a time that is DateTimeKind.Unspecified, to Utc, it doesn't change the time of day. It just changes the kind.

class Program
{
    static System.IO.MemoryStream StringToMemoryStream(string s)
    {
        byte[] a = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(s);
        return new System.IO.MemoryStream(a);
    }


    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var settings = new System.Xml.XmlWriterSettings { OmitXmlDeclaration = true, Indent= true };
        XmlSerializerNamespaces _ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
        _ns.Add( "", "" );

        Console.WriteLine("\nDate Serialization testing...");

        for (int m=0; m < 2; m++)
        {
            var builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder();

            DateTime t = DateTime.Parse("2009-08-18T22:31:24.0019-04:00");
            DateSerTest d = new DateSerTest
                { 
                    Date = t,
                    DateTime = t
                };

            Console.WriteLine("\nRound {0}", m+1);
            if (m==1)
                d.Date = d.Date.ToUniversalTime();

            Console.WriteLine("d.Date {2,-11} = {0} Kind({1})", d.Date.ToString("u"), d.Date.Kind.ToString(),
                              (m==1) ? "(converted)" : "(original)" );
            Console.WriteLine("d.DateTime         = {0} Kind({1})", d.DateTime.ToString("u"), d.DateTime.Kind.ToString());

            XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(DateSerTest));

            Console.WriteLine("\nSerialize d");
            using ( var writer = System.Xml.XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
            {
                ser.Serialize(writer, d, _ns);
            }
            string xml = builder.ToString();
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", xml);

            Console.WriteLine("\nDeserialize into d2");
            System.IO.MemoryStream ms = StringToMemoryStream(xml);
            DateSerTest d2= (DateSerTest) ser.Deserialize(ms);

            Console.WriteLine("d2.Date    = {0} Kind({1})", d2.Date.ToString("u"), d2.Date.Kind.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine("d2.DateTime= {0} Kind({1})", d2.DateTime.ToString("u"), d2.DateTime.Kind.ToString());

            Console.WriteLine("\nAfter SpecifyKind");
            d2.Date = DateTime.SpecifyKind(d2.Date, DateTimeKind.Utc);
            Console.WriteLine("d2.Date    = {0} Kind({1})", d2.Date.ToString("u"), d2.Date.Kind.ToString());

            Console.WriteLine("\nRe-Serialize d2");
            builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
            using ( var writer = System.Xml.XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
            {
                ser.Serialize(writer, d2, _ns);
            }
            xml = builder.ToString();
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", xml);

        }
    }
}

The results:


    Date Serialization testing...

    Round 1
    d.Date (original)  = 2009-08-18 22:31:24Z Kind(Local)
    d.DateTime         = 2009-08-18 22:31:24Z Kind(Local)

    Serialize d
    <DateSerTest>
      <Date>2009-08-18</Date>
      <DateTime>2009-08-18T22:31:24.0019-04:00</DateTime>
    </DateSerTest>

    Deserialize into d2
    d2.Date    = 2009-08-18 00:00:00Z Kind(Unspecified)
    d2.DateTime= 2009-08-18 22:31:24Z Kind(Local)

    After SpecifyKind
    d2.Date    = 2009-08-18 00:00:00Z Kind(Utc)

    Re-Serialize d2
    <DateSerTest>
      <Date>2009-08-18</Date>
      <DateTime>2009-08-18T22:31:24.0019-04:00</DateTime>
    </DateSerTest>

    Round 2
    d.Date (converted) = 2009-08-19 02:31:24Z Kind(Utc)
    d.DateTime         = 2009-08-18 22:31:24Z Kind(Local)

    Serialize d
    <DateSerTest>
      <Date>2009-08-19</Date>
      <DateTime>2009-08-18T22:31:24.0019-04:00</DateTime>
    </DateSerTest>

    Deserialize into d2
    d2.Date    = 2009-08-19 00:00:00Z Kind(Unspecified)
    d2.DateTime= 2009-08-18 22:31:24Z Kind(Local)

    After SpecifyKind
    d2.Date    = 2009-08-19 00:00:00Z Kind(Utc)

    Re-Serialize d2
    <DateSerTest>
      <Date>2009-08-19</Date>
      <DateTime>2009-08-18T22:31:24.0019-04:00</DateTime>
    </DateSerTest>
share|improve this answer
    
You're right that the problem is on the serialization of UTC dates -- that's why I abridged my sample to just that -- I've now added the rest. –  Wayne Aug 19 '09 at 13:13
    
Unspecified DateTimes do indeed get converted as if they were Local, according to MSDN: DateTime.ToUniversalTime Method ... Unspecified The current DateTime object is assumed to be a local time, and the conversion is performed as if Kind were Local. –  Wayne Aug 19 '09 at 16:05
    
SpecifyKind, of course, doesn't change the time or date. –  Wayne Aug 19 '09 at 16:06
    
Ok, so my understanding is that you were expecting different results from the conversion you did. But that's not an error in the library. It still appears to be behaving correctly. –  Cheeso Aug 19 '09 at 17:04

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