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I try to use a variable i inside the << block. But it fails because of the compilation errors

Global symbol "$i_0" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_0" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_1" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_1" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_2" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_2" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_0" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_1" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.
Global symbol "$i_2" requires explicit package name at D:/development/perl/SupportCases/createFTL.pl line 76.

How do I have to define the variables inside the << block?

Thanks

my $i = 1;
for ($i = 1; $i <=6; $i++){

my $block = <<BLOCK;
    <#if ((model.fields.txt_Artikel_Z$i?? || model.fields.txt_Artikel_Z$i.value = "") && 
                (model.fields.txt_Artikelnummer_Z$i?? || model.fields.txt_Artikelnummer_Z$i.value = "") &&
                    (model.fields.txt_Anzahl_Z$i?? || model.fields.txt_Anzahl_Z$i.value = "") &&
                        (model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_0?? || model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_0.value = "") &&
                            (model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_1?? || model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_1.value = "")&&
                                (model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_2?? || model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_2.value = "")) 
                                &&
                        (!(model.fields.txt_Artikel_Z$i.value = "") && 
                                !(model.fields.txt_Artikelnummer_Z$i.value = "") &&
                                    !(model.fields.txt_Anzahl_Z$i.value = "") &&
                                        !(model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_0.value = "") &&
                                            !(model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_1.value = "")&&
                                                !(model.fields.chk_Ware_aus_Z$i_2.value = ""))                                                                                              
        >
        <#else>
            <result type="ERROR" 
                field="txt_Fehlerbericht_Arbeiten_Z$i"
                code="-1" 
                message="Komplette Zeile $i muss ausgefüllt sein!" />

        </#if>
BLOCK

print "$block";

}
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2  
Try something like ${i} to distinguish it from $i_x –  Frobzig Oct 19 '12 at 13:47
    
Put BLOCK in quotes: "BLOCK". –  Paul Beckingham Oct 19 '12 at 13:48
1  
@PaulBeckingham, double quote behavior is the default, so that isn't necessary. The errors also clearly show that the interpolation is being attempted. –  dan1111 Oct 19 '12 at 14:11
    
BLOCK and "BLOCK" have the same effect, but "BLOCK" is more explicit what you're wanting to do. There's even a Perl::Critic policy to check for this. –  Andy Lester Oct 19 '12 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

They work just like in any other double-quoted string. If you want $varname to be interpolated then use the syntax "...${varname}...". Same for the here-doc.

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In a case where the variable name in interpolation would be ambiguous, use braces. ${i} should work. Such as: my $string = "${i}_2";. Otherwise Perl would think you want to insert a variable called $i_2. This works the same in a block as it does in a regular string.

Also, C-style for loops are almost never necessary in Perl. Here is how to do the same thing in a more Perlish style:

foreach my $i (1..6) { ...
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