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I've got the following XAML (simplified):

<Grid x:Name="parentGrid">
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition/>
        <RowDefinition/>
        <RowDefinition/>
        <RowDefinition/>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>

    <Grid Grid.Row="0">
        <!-- content which fits its parent grid -->
    </Grid>

    <Grid Grid.Row="1">
        <!-- content which fits its parent grid -->
    </Grid>

    <Grid Grid.Row="2">
        <!-- content which fits its parent grid -->
    </Grid>

    <Grid Grid.Row="3">
        <!-- content which fits its parent grid -->
    </Grid>
</Grid>

That's a configurable container, which holds one to four of our dialogs. This container is reused a lot and the amount of containing dialogs always differs.

The requirement is, that if there is just one dialog (so just the first grid is filled), it should stretch over the whole parent grid. If there are two grids filled, each container should fill the half of the parent grid. If there are three... and so forth.

I couldn't get it work with neither <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/> (default anyway) nor <RowDefinition Height="*"/>. E.g if there is just one Grid filled, it doesn't fit the whole parent grid. If I remove three RowDefinitions, it works though.

Additional information: the non-filled grids visibility is always set to Visibility.Collapsed.

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Width="Auto" would be for a Column, did you try Height="Auto" ? Or perhaps instead of using a Grid as your Parent, try a StackPanel instead? –  Chris W. Oct 19 '12 at 14:19
2  
I feel like this should be easy, but I can't find a simple solution so maybe its not. Setting Height="Auto" doesn't help because that sizes the rows to the content size, and the content size varies based on the number of items. Might be able to do this with a Converter, but its hard to tell without knowing what determines which Grid's are shown and how this container is used. Another idea to try is a UniformGrid with the Rows property bound to the # of visible items, but once again that depends on how the # of visible items is determined. –  Rachel Oct 19 '12 at 15:33
    
Ah ya I didnt pay attention to the filling equally of the parent part. I like Rachels's idea of the UniformGrid with the rows bound like she recommended. Could do the same with a regular grid but I would think that would be your best route. +1 –  Chris W. Oct 19 '12 at 18:58
    
Sorry, I meant Height, of course. That was just a typing error. However, is this UniformGrid available in Silverlight 5? @Rachel: sorry, but what is meant with #? –  ebeeb Oct 22 '12 at 6:42
    
@ebeeb Sorry, # is a lazy way of saying Number. You may be able to use a UniformGrid with it's Rows property bound to {Binding NumberItems}, but that depends on if a property is available to tell you how many items there are. Also, if a UniformGrid is not available in Silverlight, you can try using some AttachedProperties from my blog that let you bind a regular Grid's RowCount –  Rachel Oct 22 '12 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

I've always found that if you want to hide a column or row that you bind a property to it like so:

<Grid x:Name="ParentGrid">
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Height="{Binding GridRow0}" />
        <RowDefinition Height="{Binding GridRow1}" />
        <RowDefinition Height="{Binding GridRow2}" />
        <RowDefinition Height="{Binding GridRow3}" />
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
<-- grid contents -->
</Grid>

Setting the properties like:

Public Property GridRow0 as GridLength = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
Public Property GridRow1 as GridLength = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
Public Property GridRow2 as GridLength = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
Public Property GridRow3 as GridLength = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)

And then when you figure out how many rows are going to be needed, you do something like pass the count to a procedure:

Public Sub FixRows(count as Integer)
    Select Case count
        Case 1
            GridRow3 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow2 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow1 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow0 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
        Case 2
            GridRow3 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow2 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow1 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow0 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
        Case 3
            GridRow3 = New GridLength(0)
            GridRow2 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow1 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow0 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
        Case 4
            GridRow3 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow2 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow1 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
            GridRow0 = New GridLength(GridUnitType.Star)
        Case Else
            'Whatever is needed
    End Select
End Sub
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up with creating a CustomPanel and a couple of NestedCustomPanels. The latter provided different behaviour, e.g. one was just there to hold exactly one configurable container, another to arrange multiple containers evenly over the screen.

On runtime the configuration was read and the certain parts to be added were created and added in code behind.

This way provided a custom behaviour for each possible configuration I can get. To reflect this on my code I provided in my starting post: there were just as much RowDefinitions added as containers were available from the configuration.

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