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I'm reading about closures, and I had difficulty understanding the difference between these 2 code snippets:

var myElements = [ /* DOM Collection */ ];

for (var i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
    myElements[i].onclick = function() {
        alert( 'You clicked on: ' + i );
    };
}

The above code should only display i as 99 for every onclick

function getHandler(n) {
    return function() {
        alert( 'You clicked on: ' + n );
    };
}

for (var i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
    myElements[i].onclick = getHandler(i);
}

And this code above displays the correct value of 'i' for every element click event!

I can't understand why the 1st one doesn't display the correct value of i. And if not, why does the 2nd one display the correct value??

They were taken from this link

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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I can't understand why the 1st one doesn't display the correct value of i.

It's because the closure doesn't capture the value of i, but rather, the actual local variable i. When you go on to change the value of i, the closure sees those changes, because it's still using that same variable.

And if not, why does the 2nd one display the correct value??

Because in the second one, the closure is capturing the local variable n, which never changes thereafter. (Later calls to getHandler have a completely new local variable n; this is important, not just for closures, but also for support for recursion. Otherwise different calls to a function could accidentally mess with each other's variables!)

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Both of them display the value when the click happens.

In the first one, there is only one i, and it is 99 when the click happens.

In the second one, there is a new n for each time the getHandler is called.

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The first displays 99 for each because, by the time the function is called, the value of i is 99.

The second displays the correct values because you close over i (via the parameter n). That means that while i will continue to change, n retains the value at the time the function was called.

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In the first example, the onclick function is created in the loop, with a reference to i, but it is not executed until the click occurs. When the click is triggered, the function executes, and reads i, which is now set to 99.

In the second example, getHandler(i) is executed immediately, returning a function with reference to n. (This is why the returned function is called a closure: it has "closed" over the value passed in). In this new function scope, n is equal to the value that was passed in--the value you are looking for.

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onclick function is destined to be fired later.

In the first case the value of i is lost till the event is fired,

But in the second case the value of i is is copied & saved for later.

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The reason the 2nd example works and the 1st doesn't is to do with scope. In the first example, the variable i is stored within the global scope, and read when you click a button. As you've completed the loop, i is 99. If you had been able to click button 1 while still in the loop, you would get whatever the current value of i is. (Which isn't possible by the way).

In the second example, a copy of i is stored within the function getHandler, which will not change when you change i in the loop. getHandler is the scope the (unnamed) function you return, and as such that's the variable it reads.

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The "i" variable is bound to the scope, you can create a new scope with a function evaluated at the moment when "i" has the right value

You can implement this behavior:

var myElements = [{}, {}];

for (var i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
    myElements[i].onclick =
        function(i) {
            return function() {
                alert( 'You clicked on: ' + i );
            }
        }(i); // <- This behavior is the important one
}

Greetings

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