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Say there are form inputs posted with array-style names:

<input type="text" name="user[name]" value="John" />
<input type="text" name="user[email]" value="foo@example.org" />
<input type="checkbox" name="user[prefs][]" value="1" checked="checked" />
<input type="checkbox" name="user[prefs][]" value="2" checked="checked" />
<input type="text" name="other[example][var]" value="foo" />

Then $_POST would come back like this, print_r()'d:

Array
(
    [user] => Array
        (
            [name] => John
            [email] => foo@example.org
            [prefs] => Array
                (
                    [0] => 1
                    [1] => 2
                )

        )

    [other] => Array
        (
            [example] => Array
                (
                    [var] => foo
                )

        )

)

The goal is to be able call a function, like this:

$form_values = form_values($_POST);

That would return an associative array with keys similar to the style of the original input names:

Array
(
    [user[name]] => John
    [user[email]] => foo@example.org
    [user[prefs][]] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1
            [1] => 2
        )

    [other[example][var]] => foo
)

This has been very challenging, and at this point my "wheels are spinning in the mud." :-[

share|improve this question
    
If you did $user = $_POST['user'];, you could access the username by doing $user['name'], I'm not sure why you want to embed the array brackets into the key as you would be taking apart the data structure that already holds the data in a more accessible and meaningful manner. –  MatthewMcGovern Oct 19 '12 at 14:37
    
It's because I've been working on a form class that can output a textbox like say <?php echo $form->input(array('type' => 'text', 'name' => 'user[email]')) ?>. I think that being able to extract the keys in this way would make it trivial to check for a default value for the textbox. Make sense? 'user[email]' would be a key in the $form_values example and hold the submitted value. –  groovenectar Oct 19 '12 at 14:44
    
Hmm. Could always alter the input commands to take an array for "name" instead. I.e. $form->input(array('type' => 'text', 'name' => array('user', 'name')); This way you can then access $_POST[$array[0][$array[1]]] –  MatthewMcGovern Oct 19 '12 at 14:48
    
Thanks not a bad idea either, nice, but I kinda like having the $form->input() method accepting the arguments as they would appear in the HTML output... –  groovenectar Oct 19 '12 at 15:38
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you need to do this but if that following code can give you a hint :

$testArray = array ( 'user' => array ( 'name' => 'John', 'email' => 'test@example.org', 'prefs' => array ( 0 => '1', ), ), 'other' => array ( 'example' => array ( 'var' => 'foo', ), ), );

function toPlain($in,$track=null)
{
    $ret = array();
    foreach ($in as $k => $v) {
        $encappedKey = $track ? "[$k]" : $k; /* If it's a root */

        if (is_array($v)) {
            $ret = array_merge($ret,toPlain($v,$track.$encappedKey));
        } else {
            $ret = array_merge($ret,array($track.$encappedKey => $v));
        }
    }
    return $ret;
}
print_r(toPlain($testArray));

http://codepad.org/UAo9qNwo

share|improve this answer
    
Nice work! I think that will do it... Here is a slight modification as the 'user[prefs][]' case is somewhat of a "gotcha" with it appending numeric elements... codepad.org/RJ17xZ7k It checks for a sequential numeric array per gist.github.com/1965669 The reason for this function is described in a comment on the original post. Thanks! –  groovenectar Oct 19 '12 at 15:34
    
If you get a chance to read the reasoning from the first post, does it make sense why I would want to recreate the arrays like this? –  groovenectar Oct 19 '12 at 15:41
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Well I tried my own crazy way of doing it, if you want to test it.

<?php
function buildArray($input, &$output, $inputkey='')
{
    foreach($input as $key => $value)
    {
        if(is_array($value))
        {
            if($inputkey != "")
            {
                $inputkey .= "[$key]";
                buildArray($value, $output, $inputkey);
            }
            else
            {
                buildArray($value, $output, $key);
            }

        }
        else
        {
             $output[$inputkey."[$key]"] = $value;
        }
    }
 }

 $output = array();
 $input = array("user"=>array("name"=>"John","Email"=>"test.com","prefs"=>array(1,2)), "other"=>array("example"=>array("var"=>"foo")));
 buildArray($input, $output);
 print_r($output);
?>

I don't know the power of most built in PHP functions as I've yet to learn them so I came up with my own recursive way.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks! Your function appears to produce the desired output.. I went with the first answer though... I'm partial to it returning the array rather than accepting and modifying a reference to $output... –  groovenectar Oct 19 '12 at 15:42
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