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I want to configure a Jackson deserializer that act differently depending on the target type of the annotated field.

public class Car {
    @JsonSerialize(using=IdSerializer.class)
    @JsonDeserialize(using=IdDeserializer.class)
    String id
}

public class Bus {
    @JsonSerialize(using=IdSerializer.class)
    @JsonDeserialize(using=IdDeserializer.class)
    Id id
}

Jackson serializers know the type from which it is converting data, so this is working:

public class IdSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Object> {
    @Override
    public void serialize(Object value, JsonGenerator jsonGen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {

        // value is the annotated field class
        if(value instanceof String)
            jsonGen.writeObject(...);
        else if (value instanceof Id)
            jsonGen.writeObject(...);
        else 
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }
}

Jackson deserializers seem to do not know the target type into which it will convert data:

public class IdDeserializer extends JsonDeserializer<Object> {
    @Override
    public Object deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext context) throws IOException {

        // what is the annotated field class?
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You could add some type information to the serialization. –  Kyle Renfro Oct 19 '12 at 15:10
    
@KyleRenfro Can you provide a code sample? Thanks. –  yves amsellem Oct 19 '12 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

In the serializer, you could add extra information about the type that will help you during deserialization.

Building from your posted IdSerializer...

public class IdSerializer extends JsonSerializer<Object> {

    @Override
    public void serialize(Object value, JsonGenerator jsonGen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {

        // value is the annotated field class
        if(value instanceof String){
            jsonGen.writeStartObject();
            jsonGen.writeFieldName("id");
            jsonGen.writeObject(value);
            jsonGen.writeFieldName("type");
            jsonGen.writeString("String");
            jsonGen.writeEndObject();
        }
        else if (value instanceof Id){
            Id id = (Id) value;
            jsonGen.writeStartObject();
            jsonGen.writeFieldName("id");
            jsonGen.writeString(id.getStuff());
            jsonGen.writeFieldName("type");
            jsonGen.writeString("Id");
            jsonGen.writeEndObject();
        }
        else{
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
    }
}

In your deserializer, you can parse this 'type' field and return an Object of the proper type.

share|improve this answer
    
The serialized object is persisted into a database. So, using jsonGen seems prohibited (it will persist useless data in DB). –  yves amsellem Oct 19 '12 at 16:22
    
Just to be clear, you are saving json into the database? This method will require more bytes, but the type information does not seem useless, as you will need it to deserialize. –  Kyle Renfro Oct 19 '12 at 16:30
    
The database Document is the same whatever the persisted Java objects. The idea is to save the Id as is, and to transform other object to Id. With the same annotation for everyone. –  yves amsellem Oct 20 '12 at 0:08

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