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 On branch master
# Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by 1 commit.
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       deleted:    web/img/add-btn-bg.png
#       deleted:    web/img/add-tribute-button.png
#       deleted:    web/img/bottom-shadow.png
#       deleted:    web/img/database-line.png
#       deleted:    web/img/glyphicons-halflings-white.png
#       deleted:    web/img/glyphicons-halflings.png
#       deleted:    web/img/header-logo.png
#       deleted:    web/img/horizontal-line.png
#       deleted:    web/img/icons-btn.png
#       deleted:    web/img/icons.png
#       deleted:    web/img/line-bottom-menu.png
#       deleted:    web/img/never-forget.png
#       deleted:    web/img/tribute-icon-line.png
#       deleted:    web/img/uszatek.jpg
#       deleted:    web/img/uszatek_106.jpg
#       deleted:    web/img/uszatek_148.jpg
#       deleted:    web/img/uszatek_32.jpg
#       deleted:    web/img/uszatek_50.jpg
#
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   web/app_dev.php
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       img/
#       randomNames.csv
#       sampledb.tgz
#       watch/
#       web/assets/
#       web/uploads/

I need have back file from "Changes to be commited". How to do it?

share|improve this question
    
Did you actually read what you posted? Git is telling you exactly what you need to do: (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage) followed by (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory). –  meagar Oct 19 '12 at 15:12
    
I know, but I wrote "git reset HEAD web/img/*" and it didn't work so I thought I had to do something else. Sorry.. –  kspacja Oct 19 '12 at 15:35
    
If you've already removed web/img/*, running git reset HEAD web/img/* won't do anything, because the shell attempts to expand web/img/* before calling git, fails, and so passes the literal string web/img/*, which git will try to match to a literal file name. It's a pain, but you'll have to run git reset HEAD web/imgadd-btn-bg.png and so on for each individual file (or parse the git status to generate the list of files (something like git reset HEAD $(git status | awk '/deleted:/ { print $NF }') (not tested). –  twalberg Oct 19 '12 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you haven't yet committed, here's how to get a file back (using web/img/glyphicons-halflings-white.png as an example):

git reset HEAD web/img/glyphicons-halflings-white.png
git checkout -f web/img/glyphicons-halflings-white.png

This will unstage the remove operation, and then restore the file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answer... but I tell why didn't "git reset HEAD web/img/*" work to me? –  kspacja Oct 19 '12 at 15:23
    
The reason that didn't work is because "*" is evaluated by bash, not git. Since there's nothing to expand (you deleted the files), bash just passes that straight in to git. And git doesn't do wildcard expansion. –  Chris Oct 19 '12 at 17:25

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