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Suppose we have:

The storm door is a closed door. It is south of the Garden and north of the Shed.

The following commands all work fine to go through the door from the Garden:

  • south
  • s
  • go through storm door
  • go through
  • enter door

However go in doesn't work:

>go in

You can't go that way.

and I can't find a reasonable way to make it work. The best I can do is this, which seems rather absurd:

Inside of the garden is Tumbolia. Outside of the shed is Tumbolia.

Instead of going to Tumbolia from the garden, try entering the storm door.

Instead of going to Tumbolia from the shed, try entering the storm door.

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2 Answers 2

I think you could also do this:

The storm door is a closed door. It is south of the Garden and north of the Shed.

The Shed is inside from the Garden.

Instead of going inside from the Garden, try going south.

Instead of going outside from the Shed, try going north.
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The best I was able to come up with was:

Instead of going nowhere in the Garden when the noun is inside, try entering the storm door.

Instead of exiting in the Shed, try entering the storm door.

With this wording, go in / go inside / in / inside all work when in the Garden, and go out / go outside / out / outside / leave / exit all work when in the Shed.

The asymmetry here is because out and go out are interpreted as exiting, a special action. (It is converted to going outside by “the convert exit into go out rule”, but only if there is actually a door or room in the “outside” direction.) Whereas in and go in are interpreted as going inside from the beginning; there is no handy generic entering action for us to use.

To make just plain enter work, add:

Rule for supplying a missing noun when entering in the Garden: now the noun is the storm door.

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